Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker
Canada caring for caregivers
Launching 2 new pilots: Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker

June 15, 2019 – Toronto – Canada is caring for its caregivers by launching 2 new 
pilots that will help caregivers who come to this country make it their permanent 
home.
 
The Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots will open for 
applications on June 18, 2019, replacing the expiring Caring for Children 
and Caring for People with High Medical Needs pilots. 
 
Caregivers will now only receive a work permit if they have a job offer in Canada 
and meet standard criteria for economic immigration programs. Once working in 
Canada, caregivers will be able to begin gaining the required 2 years of Canadian 
work experience to apply for permanent residence.     
 
Through these new pilots, caregivers will also benefit from: 
· occupation-specific work permits, rather than employer-specific, to allow for 
a fast change of employers when necessary; 
· open work permits and/or study permits for the caregivers’ immediate family, 
to help families come to Canada together; and
· a clear transition from temporary to permanent status, to ensure that once 
caregivers have met the work experience requirement, they will be able to become 
permanent residents quickly.
 
These new pilots provide caregivers from abroad and their families with a clear, 
direct pathway to permanent residence. 
 
Canada is committed to improving life for immigrants and supporting jobs for 
the middle class.
 
Quote  
 
“Canada is caring for our caregivers. We made a commitment to improve 
the lives of caregivers and their families who come from around the world to care 
for our loved ones and with these new pilots, we are doing exactly that.” 
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
Quick facts: 
 
· The expiring pilots will close to new applications on June 18, 2019. Caregivers 
who have applied before this date will continue to have their applications 
processed through to a final decision. 
· Caregivers who have been working toward applying to the soon-to-be-expired 
pilots can now apply through either the Home Child Care Provider Pilot 
or the Home Support Worker Pilot.
· The Interim Pathway for Caregivers, the short-term pathway for caregivers 
who came to Canada as temporary foreign workers since 2014 but were unable to 
qualify for permanent residence through an existing program, will be extended. 
It will re-open on July 8, 2019 and accept applications for 3 months.
· The new pilots, Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker, will each 
have a maximum of 2,750 principal applicants, for a total of 5,500 principal 
applicants per year, plus their immediate family.
· Initial applications to the new pilots will have a 12-month processing service 
standard. A 6-month processing standard will apply for finalizing an application 
after the caregiver submits proof that they have met the work experience 
requirement.
· With the move to occupation-specific work permits under the Home Child Care 
and Home Support Worker pilots, employers will no longer need a Labour 
Market Impact Assessment before hiring a caregiver from overseas. 
 
Related link:

Infographic: How do the new caregiver programs work?
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/infographics/
child-care-home-support-worker.html 

Follow us:
 
· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
More..Posted: Jun 15, 2019
Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot Takes Off
Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot Takes Off

Eleven communities to attract newcomers to support middle-class jobs

June 14, 2019—Sault Ste. Marie, ON — Eleven rural and northern communities 
have been selected as part of the new Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot to 
invite newcomers to make these communities their forever homes.
 
As the Canadian population ages and the birth rate declines, rural Canada’s 
workforce has seen a significant decrease in available workers. This pilot will help 
attract people that are needed to drive economic growth and help support 
middle-class jobs in these communities. 
 
The participating rural and northern communities will have access to a range of 
supports to test this new innovative, community-driven model that will help fill 
labour gaps. The selected communities are: Thunder Bay (ON), Sault Ste. Marie 
(ON), Sudbury (ON), Timmins (ON), North Bay (ON), 
Gretna-Rhineland-Altona-Plum Coulee (MB), Brandon (MB), Moose Jaw (SK), 
Claresholm (AB), West Kootenay (BC), and Vernon (BC). The participating 
communities were selected as a representative sample of the regions across 
Canada to assist in laying out the blueprint for the rest of the country.
 
To complement the Rural and Northern Pilot, Canada is also working with 
the territories to address the unique immigration needs in Canada’s North.
 
Canada is committed to attracting the best talent around the world to fill skill 
shortages and drive local economies in rural Canada that will benefit all Canadians. 
 
Quotes   
 
“The equation is quite simple. Attracting and retaining newcomers with 
the needed skills equals a recipe for success for Canada’s rural and northern 
communities. We have tested a similar immigration pilot in Atlantic Canada 
and it has already shown tremendous results for both newcomers and Canadians.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
“Removing barriers to economic development and promoting growth in local 
communities across the country is a priority for the Government of Canada. 
This pilot will support the economic development of these communities by testing 
new, community-driven approaches to address their diverse labour market needs. 
The initial results of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot show that it has been a great 
success. I’m pleased we are able to introduce this new pilot to continue 
experimenting with how immigration can help ensure the continued vibrancy of 
rural areas across the country.”
– The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Rural Economic Development 
Canada
 
“Small initiatives can mean big results for the future of towns like Sault Ste. 
Marie in our tourism, mining and manufacturing sectors. The jobs of tomorrow for 
the middle-class go hand-in-hand with economic development and filling key 
vacancies with skilled talent from around the world.”
– Terry Sheehan, Member of Parliament for Sault Ste. Marie
 
Quick Facts
 
· Throughout the summer, the government will begin working with selected 
communities to position them to identify candidates for permanent residence 
as early as the fall 2019.
· Communities will be responsible for candidate recruitment and endorsement for 
permanent residence.
· Newcomers are expected to begin to arrive under this pilot in 2020.
· Communities worked with local economic development organizations to submit 
an application which demonstrated how they met the eligibility criteria by 
March 11, 2019. 
The Atlantic Immigration Pilot was launched in March 2017 as part of 
the Atlantic Growth Strategy. The four Atlantic provinces are able to endorse up to 
2,500 workers in 2019 under that pilot to meet labour market needs in the region.
Rural communities employ over four million Canadians and account for 
almost 30% of the national GDP.
· Rural Canada supplies food, water, and energy for urban centres, sustaining 
the industries that contribute to Canada’s prosperous economy. 
· Between 2001 and 2016, the number of potential workers has decreased by 
23% percent, while the number of potential retirees has increased by 40%.
 
Associated Links

· Backgrounder 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/01/
supporting-middle-class-jobs-in-rural-and-northern-communities-through-
immigration.html

· Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/rural-northern-immigration-pilot-about.html

· Immigration Matters
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/
immigration-matters.html

· Infographic
https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/ircc/documents/pdf/english/services/
immigrate-canada/rural-northern-immigration-pilot/
rnip-process-map-english.pdf 

Follow us: 

· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/ 
 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
 
 

More..Posted: Jun 14, 2019
Migrant Care Worker Groups Across Canada Available to Comment on Caregiver Program Announcement
June 14, 2019

Migrant Care Worker Groups Across Canada Available to Comment on Caregiver 
Program Announcement

Canada - Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, and associated MPs across 
the country are expected to announce changes to the migrant Caregiver Program 
on Saturday, June 15, 2019. Migrant Care Worker groups - members of 
the Landed Status Now campaign - will be available to comment on the impact on 
Care Workers shortly after the announcement. 

Toronto
Kara Manso - 647-782-6633 - Caregivers Action Centre
Martha Ocampo - 416-560-0940 - Caregiver Connections (CCESO)

Vancouver: 
Lorina Serafico - 604- 618-3649 - Committee for Domestic Worker and Caregiver 
Rights
Chris Sorio - 416-828-0441 - Migrante BC

Ottawa
Aimee Beboso - 613-255-1921 - Migrante Ottawa

Montreal
Evelyn Mondonedo - emc@pinayquebec.org - PINAY Quebec

Background

The current Caregiver Program is a pilot program created in 2014 by the previous 
Conservative government. It is set to expire in November 2019 (just six months). 
Only 1,955 Care Workers and dependents were granted permanent residency in 
the first 36 months under the current Caregiver program. This is in stark contrast 
to the average  10,740 Care Workers and their dependants who received 
permanent resident status every year under the previous Live-In Caregiver 
program. This meant that thousands of Caregivers face even longer years of 
family separation. 
Responding to immense Caregiver advocacy and outrage, the current government 
launched an Interim Pathway on March 4, 2019 which ran until June 4 to open up 
a path to permanent resident status for the thousands of Caregivers who were 
shut out. 
However, the Interim Pathway was closed to Caregivers who have become 
undocumented; has an extremely small window of time to apply; and, required 
an unnecessarily high language score. Care Workers across Canada are urging 
the federal government to: 
Expand the Interim Pathway to all workers who came to Canada under 
the 2014 Pilot Caregiver program (i.e., grandfather all current caregivers in 
the program under the Interim Pathway). For those without enough service 
accumulated, ensure workers can be grandfathered into the new 2019 Caregiver 
Pilot Program;
Allow Care Workers to apply if they have worked in Canada for 12 month, 
even if the work was done without a work permit;
Allow undocumented workers to apply; 
Reduce the required language level. Care Workers came to Canada with a required 
language level of CLB Level 3. Therefore, the language requirement for permanent 
residence should remain at Level 3, and not be increased to Level 5. 
With the extremely limited application window, if workers do not score 
at Level 5 in the first attempt, they may not be able to retake the test in time;
Remove requirement for second medical examination; and,
An Interim Pathway for Quebec be created in coordination with Quebec-based 
Care Worker groups and the Government of Quebec.

Federal Workers Program

Landed Status Now demands the creation of a Federal Care Worker Program that 
provides landed status upon entry for Care Workers and our families. 
Care Workers should be able to seek employment in Canada through the national 
job bank. Employers seeking caregivers can use the job bank to find caregiver 
employees. This would take away the need for third-party recruiters / job agencies 
and the thousands of dollars they charge us to get a job. 

Landed Status Now: Care Workers Organize (www.LandedStatusNow.ca) is
 a national coalition including Caregivers Action Centre (Toronto); Caregivers
Connection (Toronto); Alberta Careworkers Association (Edmonton); 
Migrante Alberta; Migrant BC, Migrante Canada; Migrante Ottawa; PINAY Quebec; 
Immigrant Workers Centre (Montreal); Association for the Rights of Household 
Workers (Montreal), Vancouver Committee for Domestic Workers and Caregiver 
Rights (Vancouver), Migrant Workers Alliance for Change (Canada) and Migrant 
Rights Network (Canada). 


More..Posted: Jun 14, 2019
Canada to Epower Visible Minority Newcomer Women
Canada to empower visible minority newcomer women
Making it easier for women to succeed as they settle in their new country
 
June 6, 2019—Toronto, ON— Canada is making it easier for newcomer women to 
find a job by providing the support and services they need to succeed. This will 
help these women highlight their talents and experiences as they settle in 
Canada. 
 
Some newcomer women face multiple barriers trying to find work and get 
ahead in Canada. This includes gender- and race-based discrimination, precarious 
or low income employment, lack of affordable childcare, and weak social 
and employment supports. 
 
Recognizing these challenges, the government has selected 22 organizations from 
across the country that understand visible minority newcomer women, the barriers 
they face, and their circumstances. These organizations will launch projects over 
the next 2 years that will:
· Develop and test innovative approaches to enable more visible minority 
newcomer women to find a job and succeed at work;
· Support smaller organizations to increase their capacity to serve visible minority 
newcomer women and enable them to overcome barriers to employment; and/or
· Increase the digital literacy of visible minority newcomer women to access 
and advance within the Canadian labour market.
The Government is committed to the full and equal participation of all women 
and girls, which is essential to Canada's economic growth and prosperity. 

Quotes
 
“Visible minority newcomer women face more challenges than any other group to 
enter the workforce. This isn’t just about getting women jobs; it’s also about 
providing a sense of dignity and belonging. Canada’s gender equality is for 
all women, not just for some.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
“Visible minority newcomer women face many intersecting barriers when trying to 
find a job. If we want to advance gender equality, we need to acknowledge that 
they exist and actively work to dismantle them. Everyone deserves to be able to 
develop their skills and find a good job so that they can take care of themselves 
and their family. By supporting the organizations taking part in this pilot project, 
we can better ensure that all women have an equal opportunity at success.”
– The Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of International Development 
and Minister for Women and Gender Equality
Quick facts
 
· The Government is providing up to $7.5 million over two years to 
the selected 22 organizations to deliver new projects.
· In December 2018, the government launched an expression of interest 
process to solicit proposals from organizations for new projects.
· Visible minority newcomer women have the lowest median annual income of all 
newcomer groups at $26,624, compared to non-visible minority newcomer 
women ($30,074), visible minority newcomer men ($35,574), and non-visible 
minority newcomer men ($42,591).
· Visible minority newcomer women are more likely to be unemployed. 
The unemployment rate of visible minority newcomer women (9.7%) is higher 
than that of visible minority (8.5%) and non-visible minority (6.4%) newcomer 
men, based on the 2016 Census.
 
Related product 
 
· Backgrounder—New partners selected to support visible minority newcomer 
women 

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/06/
new-partners-selected-to-support-visible-minority-newcomer-women.html 


Associated link:
 
· Supporting Visible Minority Newcomer Women
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2018/12/
supporting-visible-minority-newcomer-women.html 


Follow us:
 
· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/

 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
 
 
More..Posted: Jun 07, 2019