Minister Duclos to Make Announcement in Toronto on the Canada Child Benefit
Minister Duclos to make announcement in Toronto on the Canada Child Benefit 
 
The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children 
and Social Development, and Jean Yip, Member of Parliament for 
Scarborough — Agincourt, will discuss how the Government of Canada is 
improving the Canada Child Benefit to better help middle‐class families 
and those working hard to join the middle class. 
 
 
A photo opportunity and media availability will follow the announcement.
 
Please note that all details are subject to change. All times are local.
 
                   
DATE:       Thursday, July 18, 2019
 
TIME:         9:00 a.m.
 
PLACE      Learning Jungle Kennedy
                   3376 Kennedy Road
                   Toronto, ON 
 
FOR INFORMATION (media only):
Valérie Glazer
Press Secretary
Office of the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, P.C., M.P
Minister of Families, Children and Social Development
819-654-5546
 
Media Relations Office
Employment and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
 
 
More..Posted: Jul 22, 2019
New Agri-Food Immigration Pilot
New Agri-Food Immigration Pilot
Attracting workers to the agri-food sector across Canada
 
July 12, 2019 – Mississauga – Canada is committed to attracting the best talent 
from around the world to fill skill shortages, drive local economies, and create 
and support middle-class jobs in communities across the country that will benefit 
all Canadians. 
 
Canada is launching a new 3-year economic immigration pilot that will fill labour 
shortages, particularly in meat processing and mushroom production, 
within the agri-food sector and help meet Canada’s ambitious export targets.
 
The agriculture and agri-food industry is an important contributor to Canada’s 
economic growth and vitality, supporting 1 in 8 jobs across the country. 
Agricultural exports hit a new record in 2018, reaching $66.2 billion 
 
Over the past several years, industries such as meat processing and mushroom 
production have experienced ongoing difficulty in finding and keeping new 
employees. 
 
This new pilot aims to attract and retain workers by providing them with 
an opportunity to become permanent residents.
 
The Agri-Food Immigration Pilot complements Canada’s economic immigration 
strategy, which includes the Atlantic Immigration Pilot, the Rural 
and Northern Immigration Pilot, the Global Skills Strategy, a revitalized Express 
Entry and an expanded Provincial Nominee Program.
 
Quotes   
 
““This pilot is another example of how immigration is helping to grow local 
economies and creating jobs for Canadians.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
“The success of our Canadian farmers and food processors depends on their ability 
to recruit and retain the workforce they need to capture opportunities at home 
and abroad. This pilot will help to ensure that employers in the agriculture 
and agri-food sector have the people they need to get the job done, to help drive 
our economy and to feed the world.” 
– The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food
 
“Our government is always looking for ways to promote growth in rural 
communities. This pilot provides those communities who rely on the agri-food 
sector the opportunity to address their labour market needs. It builds upon 
commitments made in Canada’s first-ever Rural Economic Development Strategy 
and the successful Atlantic Immigration Pilot.”
– The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Rural Economic Development
 
“Today we are delivering on something that employers, unions, and migrant 
workers have been calling on government to do for over a decade – temporary 
foreign workers who come to this country and work hard filling permanent jobs 
should have a fair and reasonable chance to become a Canadian regardless of 
the job they are filling.”
– Rodger Cuzner, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, 
Workforce Development and Labour
 
Quick facts: 
 
· Employers in the agri-food sector who intend to be part of the pilot will be 
eligible for a 2-year Labour Market Impact Assessment.
· Temporary foreign workers will be able to apply under this pilot in early 2020.
· A maximum of 2,750 principal applicants, plus family members, will be accepted 
for processing in any given year. This represents a total of approximately 
16,500 possible new permanent residents over the 3-year duration of the pilot.
· Addressing these labour market needs will help key industries in Canada’s 
specialized agri-food sector grow.
 
Related product:
 
· Backgrounder: Agri-Food Immigration Pilot Program
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/07/
agri-food-immigration-pilot.html 

Associated links:
 
· Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/rural-northern-immigration-pilot-about.html

· Atlantic Immigration Pilot
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/atlantic-immigration-pilot.html

· Global Talent Stream
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/
foreign-workers/global-talent/requirements.html

· Express Entry
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/express-entry.html

· Provincial Nominee Program
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/provincial-nominees.html

· Immigration Matters
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/
immigration-matters.html

 
Follow us: 

· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/ 
 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
More..Posted: Jul 12, 2019
Canada Supports Francophone Minority Communities
Canada supports Francophone minority communities
 
Newcomers settling in these regions will receive official languages training 
 
July 3, 2019 – Dieppe, N.B. – Canada is supporting 7 organizations across 
the country to provide official language training services for French-speaking
 newcomers choosing to settle in a Francophone minority community.
 
Newcomers will receive training that improves their skills in one language while 
taking more intensive training in the other, depending on their needs. Being able 
to communicate in both official languages is important in Francophone minority 
communities, where English is often the primary language used at work 
and French is more frequently used in the community, at home and in other social 
settings.
 
These organizations will launch projects that:
· help newcomers improve their skills in both languages so they can find work 
and be active participants within their community
· deliver a mix of in-person and online language training that is flexible 
and accessible
· develop resources that enhance program delivery to promote the Francophone 
Integration Pathway and Francophone minority communities
 
Canada is committed to promoting official languages across the country to attract 
the skilled newcomers needed to fill labour shortages, while supporting 
and creating middle-class jobs.
 
Quotes
 
“Francophones across the country want to attract French-speaking newcomers to 
make those communities their forever home. With these projects, we will help 
newcomers feel welcome and thrive in our Francophone minority communities, 
and become active members in our diverse communities”.
– Matt DeCourcey, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship
 
“Having a French integration pathway is a key element of our plan for the growth 
and development of Francophone communities. That is why we are committed to 
achieving 4.4% of French-speaking immigrants in our Francophone minority 
communities by 2023. We will always be there when the time comes to better 
support these communities and promote the French fact from coast to coast to 
coast”.
– The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Tourism, Official Languages 
and La Francophonie
 
Quick facts
 
· Up to $7.6 million over 4 years will be provided towards these projects.
· The Francophone Integration Pathway is a group of settlement services aimed 
at facilitating integration and creating lasting ties between French-speaking 
newcomers and Francophone minority communities.
· As announced in Budget 2018, and included in the Action Plan for Official 
Languages 2018–2023, the Government will invest almost $36.6 million over 
the next 5 years to strengthen the Francophone Integration Pathway, creating 
lasting ties between French-speaking newcomers and Francophone minority 
communities.
· In November 2018, IRCC announced the creation of a new service delivery 
model for French-speaking immigrants to help them prepare for their arrival in 
Canada, as well as improved settlement services for French-speaking immigrants 
arriving at Pearson International Airport in Toronto.
· Under the Welcoming Francophone Communities initiative, 14 communities 
have been selected to receive a total of $12.6 million over 3 years, beginning in 
2020, for projects that will help French-speaking newcomers feel welcomed 
and integrated into Francophone minority communities.
 
Related product 
 
· Backgrounder: Organizations selected to deliver adapted language training
 https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/07/
organizations-selected-to-deliver-adapted-language-training.html

Associated links
 
· Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future
https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-heritage/services/official-languages-
bilingualism/official-languages-action-plan/2018-2023.html

· Meeting Our Objectives: Francophone Immigration Strategy
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/
publications-manuals/francophone-immigration-strategy.html
 
Follow us
 
· Facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· Twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· Instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/
 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
More..Posted: Jul 04, 2019
Ministers Hussen, Freeland and Monsef Mark World Refugee Day
Ministers Hussen, Freeland and Monsef mark World Refugee Day
 
Ottawa, June 20, 2019—The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship; the Honourable Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign 
Affairs; and the Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of International 
Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality, today issued 
the following statement:  
“Canada’s support for refugees is a longstanding, unwavering commitment 
supported by communities across the country. Canadians have continually 
supported Canada’s international humanitarian response to refugee crises around 
the world.
This tradition of humanitarian support demonstrates to the world that we have 
a shared responsibility to help those who are displaced, persecuted and most in 
need of protection. We also recognize the particular, intersectional vulnerabilities 
experienced by women and girls, children, LGBTQ2 persons, and all others 
belonging to marginalized and targeted groups.
This year we celebrate Canada’s 40th anniversary of Private Sponsorship of 
Refugees Program. We thank the more than two million Canadians who have 
helped sponsor more than 327,000 refugees and have made the program a model 
around the world. Canada is sharing this expertise by helping other countries set 
up refugee sponsorship programs.
On World Refugee Day, we acknowledge the struggles faced by refugees and we 
highlight their courage and resilience. We also commend all the compassionate 
Canadians who helped out others in need.
As a recognized leader in humanitarian assistance, Canada is working hard 
globally to change the way humanitarian assistance is designed and delivered so 
that women and girls are not left behind.
Canada is an open and diverse country. For refugees fleeing danger, intolerance 
and chaos, these qualities are a source of hope, and provide a safe haven for 
the world’s most vulnerable people. This is the tradition we commemorate on 
World Refugee Day.” 
 
For further information (media only), please contact:
 
Mathieu Genest 
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064 
 
Adam Austen 
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs 
Adam.Austen@international.gc.ca
 
Media Relations          
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
CIC-Media-Relations@cic.gc.ca  
 
Media Relations Office 
Global Affairs Canada
343-203-7700
media@international.gc.ca
 
 
 
More..Posted: Jun 21, 2019
Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker
Canada caring for caregivers
Launching 2 new pilots: Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker

June 15, 2019 – Toronto – Canada is caring for its caregivers by launching 2 new 
pilots that will help caregivers who come to this country make it their permanent 
home.
 
The Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker pilots will open for 
applications on June 18, 2019, replacing the expiring Caring for Children 
and Caring for People with High Medical Needs pilots. 
 
Caregivers will now only receive a work permit if they have a job offer in Canada 
and meet standard criteria for economic immigration programs. Once working in 
Canada, caregivers will be able to begin gaining the required 2 years of Canadian 
work experience to apply for permanent residence.     
 
Through these new pilots, caregivers will also benefit from: 
· occupation-specific work permits, rather than employer-specific, to allow for 
a fast change of employers when necessary; 
· open work permits and/or study permits for the caregivers’ immediate family, 
to help families come to Canada together; and
· a clear transition from temporary to permanent status, to ensure that once 
caregivers have met the work experience requirement, they will be able to become 
permanent residents quickly.
 
These new pilots provide caregivers from abroad and their families with a clear, 
direct pathway to permanent residence. 
 
Canada is committed to improving life for immigrants and supporting jobs for 
the middle class.
 
Quote  
 
“Canada is caring for our caregivers. We made a commitment to improve 
the lives of caregivers and their families who come from around the world to care 
for our loved ones and with these new pilots, we are doing exactly that.” 
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
Quick facts: 
 
· The expiring pilots will close to new applications on June 18, 2019. Caregivers 
who have applied before this date will continue to have their applications 
processed through to a final decision. 
· Caregivers who have been working toward applying to the soon-to-be-expired 
pilots can now apply through either the Home Child Care Provider Pilot 
or the Home Support Worker Pilot.
· The Interim Pathway for Caregivers, the short-term pathway for caregivers 
who came to Canada as temporary foreign workers since 2014 but were unable to 
qualify for permanent residence through an existing program, will be extended. 
It will re-open on July 8, 2019 and accept applications for 3 months.
· The new pilots, Home Child Care Provider and Home Support Worker, will each 
have a maximum of 2,750 principal applicants, for a total of 5,500 principal 
applicants per year, plus their immediate family.
· Initial applications to the new pilots will have a 12-month processing service 
standard. A 6-month processing standard will apply for finalizing an application 
after the caregiver submits proof that they have met the work experience 
requirement.
· With the move to occupation-specific work permits under the Home Child Care 
and Home Support Worker pilots, employers will no longer need a Labour 
Market Impact Assessment before hiring a caregiver from overseas. 
 
Related link:

Infographic: How do the new caregiver programs work?
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/infographics/
child-care-home-support-worker.html 

Follow us:
 
· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
More..Posted: Jun 15, 2019
Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot Takes Off
Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot Takes Off

Eleven communities to attract newcomers to support middle-class jobs

June 14, 2019—Sault Ste. Marie, ON — Eleven rural and northern communities 
have been selected as part of the new Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot to 
invite newcomers to make these communities their forever homes.
 
As the Canadian population ages and the birth rate declines, rural Canada’s 
workforce has seen a significant decrease in available workers. This pilot will help 
attract people that are needed to drive economic growth and help support 
middle-class jobs in these communities. 
 
The participating rural and northern communities will have access to a range of 
supports to test this new innovative, community-driven model that will help fill 
labour gaps. The selected communities are: Thunder Bay (ON), Sault Ste. Marie 
(ON), Sudbury (ON), Timmins (ON), North Bay (ON), 
Gretna-Rhineland-Altona-Plum Coulee (MB), Brandon (MB), Moose Jaw (SK), 
Claresholm (AB), West Kootenay (BC), and Vernon (BC). The participating 
communities were selected as a representative sample of the regions across 
Canada to assist in laying out the blueprint for the rest of the country.
 
To complement the Rural and Northern Pilot, Canada is also working with 
the territories to address the unique immigration needs in Canada’s North.
 
Canada is committed to attracting the best talent around the world to fill skill 
shortages and drive local economies in rural Canada that will benefit all Canadians. 
 
Quotes   
 
“The equation is quite simple. Attracting and retaining newcomers with 
the needed skills equals a recipe for success for Canada’s rural and northern 
communities. We have tested a similar immigration pilot in Atlantic Canada 
and it has already shown tremendous results for both newcomers and Canadians.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
“Removing barriers to economic development and promoting growth in local 
communities across the country is a priority for the Government of Canada. 
This pilot will support the economic development of these communities by testing 
new, community-driven approaches to address their diverse labour market needs. 
The initial results of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot show that it has been a great 
success. I’m pleased we are able to introduce this new pilot to continue 
experimenting with how immigration can help ensure the continued vibrancy of 
rural areas across the country.”
– The Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Rural Economic Development 
Canada
 
“Small initiatives can mean big results for the future of towns like Sault Ste. 
Marie in our tourism, mining and manufacturing sectors. The jobs of tomorrow for 
the middle-class go hand-in-hand with economic development and filling key 
vacancies with skilled talent from around the world.”
– Terry Sheehan, Member of Parliament for Sault Ste. Marie
 
Quick Facts
 
· Throughout the summer, the government will begin working with selected 
communities to position them to identify candidates for permanent residence 
as early as the fall 2019.
· Communities will be responsible for candidate recruitment and endorsement for 
permanent residence.
· Newcomers are expected to begin to arrive under this pilot in 2020.
· Communities worked with local economic development organizations to submit 
an application which demonstrated how they met the eligibility criteria by 
March 11, 2019. 
The Atlantic Immigration Pilot was launched in March 2017 as part of 
the Atlantic Growth Strategy. The four Atlantic provinces are able to endorse up to 
2,500 workers in 2019 under that pilot to meet labour market needs in the region.
Rural communities employ over four million Canadians and account for 
almost 30% of the national GDP.
· Rural Canada supplies food, water, and energy for urban centres, sustaining 
the industries that contribute to Canada’s prosperous economy. 
· Between 2001 and 2016, the number of potential workers has decreased by 
23% percent, while the number of potential retirees has increased by 40%.
 
Associated Links

· Backgrounder 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/01/
supporting-middle-class-jobs-in-rural-and-northern-communities-through-
immigration.html

· Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/rural-northern-immigration-pilot-about.html

· Immigration Matters
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/
immigration-matters.html

· Infographic
https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/ircc/documents/pdf/english/services/
immigrate-canada/rural-northern-immigration-pilot/
rnip-process-map-english.pdf 

Follow us: 

· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/ 
 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
 
 

More..Posted: Jun 14, 2019
Migrant Care Worker Groups Across Canada Available to Comment on Caregiver Program Announcement
June 14, 2019

Migrant Care Worker Groups Across Canada Available to Comment on Caregiver 
Program Announcement

Canada - Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen, and associated MPs across 
the country are expected to announce changes to the migrant Caregiver Program 
on Saturday, June 15, 2019. Migrant Care Worker groups - members of 
the Landed Status Now campaign - will be available to comment on the impact on 
Care Workers shortly after the announcement. 

Toronto
Kara Manso - 647-782-6633 - Caregivers Action Centre
Martha Ocampo - 416-560-0940 - Caregiver Connections (CCESO)

Vancouver: 
Lorina Serafico - 604- 618-3649 - Committee for Domestic Worker and Caregiver 
Rights
Chris Sorio - 416-828-0441 - Migrante BC

Ottawa
Aimee Beboso - 613-255-1921 - Migrante Ottawa

Montreal
Evelyn Mondonedo - emc@pinayquebec.org - PINAY Quebec

Background

The current Caregiver Program is a pilot program created in 2014 by the previous 
Conservative government. It is set to expire in November 2019 (just six months). 
Only 1,955 Care Workers and dependents were granted permanent residency in 
the first 36 months under the current Caregiver program. This is in stark contrast 
to the average  10,740 Care Workers and their dependants who received 
permanent resident status every year under the previous Live-In Caregiver 
program. This meant that thousands of Caregivers face even longer years of 
family separation. 
Responding to immense Caregiver advocacy and outrage, the current government 
launched an Interim Pathway on March 4, 2019 which ran until June 4 to open up 
a path to permanent resident status for the thousands of Caregivers who were 
shut out. 
However, the Interim Pathway was closed to Caregivers who have become 
undocumented; has an extremely small window of time to apply; and, required 
an unnecessarily high language score. Care Workers across Canada are urging 
the federal government to: 
Expand the Interim Pathway to all workers who came to Canada under 
the 2014 Pilot Caregiver program (i.e., grandfather all current caregivers in 
the program under the Interim Pathway). For those without enough service 
accumulated, ensure workers can be grandfathered into the new 2019 Caregiver 
Pilot Program;
Allow Care Workers to apply if they have worked in Canada for 12 month, 
even if the work was done without a work permit;
Allow undocumented workers to apply; 
Reduce the required language level. Care Workers came to Canada with a required 
language level of CLB Level 3. Therefore, the language requirement for permanent 
residence should remain at Level 3, and not be increased to Level 5. 
With the extremely limited application window, if workers do not score 
at Level 5 in the first attempt, they may not be able to retake the test in time;
Remove requirement for second medical examination; and,
An Interim Pathway for Quebec be created in coordination with Quebec-based 
Care Worker groups and the Government of Quebec.

Federal Workers Program

Landed Status Now demands the creation of a Federal Care Worker Program that 
provides landed status upon entry for Care Workers and our families. 
Care Workers should be able to seek employment in Canada through the national 
job bank. Employers seeking caregivers can use the job bank to find caregiver 
employees. This would take away the need for third-party recruiters / job agencies 
and the thousands of dollars they charge us to get a job. 

Landed Status Now: Care Workers Organize (www.LandedStatusNow.ca) is
 a national coalition including Caregivers Action Centre (Toronto); Caregivers
Connection (Toronto); Alberta Careworkers Association (Edmonton); 
Migrante Alberta; Migrant BC, Migrante Canada; Migrante Ottawa; PINAY Quebec; 
Immigrant Workers Centre (Montreal); Association for the Rights of Household 
Workers (Montreal), Vancouver Committee for Domestic Workers and Caregiver 
Rights (Vancouver), Migrant Workers Alliance for Change (Canada) and Migrant 
Rights Network (Canada). 


More..Posted: Jun 14, 2019
Canada to Epower Visible Minority Newcomer Women
Canada to empower visible minority newcomer women
Making it easier for women to succeed as they settle in their new country
 
June 6, 2019—Toronto, ON— Canada is making it easier for newcomer women to 
find a job by providing the support and services they need to succeed. This will 
help these women highlight their talents and experiences as they settle in 
Canada. 
 
Some newcomer women face multiple barriers trying to find work and get 
ahead in Canada. This includes gender- and race-based discrimination, precarious 
or low income employment, lack of affordable childcare, and weak social 
and employment supports. 
 
Recognizing these challenges, the government has selected 22 organizations from 
across the country that understand visible minority newcomer women, the barriers 
they face, and their circumstances. These organizations will launch projects over 
the next 2 years that will:
· Develop and test innovative approaches to enable more visible minority 
newcomer women to find a job and succeed at work;
· Support smaller organizations to increase their capacity to serve visible minority 
newcomer women and enable them to overcome barriers to employment; and/or
· Increase the digital literacy of visible minority newcomer women to access 
and advance within the Canadian labour market.
The Government is committed to the full and equal participation of all women 
and girls, which is essential to Canada's economic growth and prosperity. 

Quotes
 
“Visible minority newcomer women face more challenges than any other group to 
enter the workforce. This isn’t just about getting women jobs; it’s also about 
providing a sense of dignity and belonging. Canada’s gender equality is for 
all women, not just for some.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
“Visible minority newcomer women face many intersecting barriers when trying to 
find a job. If we want to advance gender equality, we need to acknowledge that 
they exist and actively work to dismantle them. Everyone deserves to be able to 
develop their skills and find a good job so that they can take care of themselves 
and their family. By supporting the organizations taking part in this pilot project, 
we can better ensure that all women have an equal opportunity at success.”
– The Honourable Maryam Monsef, Minister of International Development 
and Minister for Women and Gender Equality
Quick facts
 
· The Government is providing up to $7.5 million over two years to 
the selected 22 organizations to deliver new projects.
· In December 2018, the government launched an expression of interest 
process to solicit proposals from organizations for new projects.
· Visible minority newcomer women have the lowest median annual income of all 
newcomer groups at $26,624, compared to non-visible minority newcomer 
women ($30,074), visible minority newcomer men ($35,574), and non-visible 
minority newcomer men ($42,591).
· Visible minority newcomer women are more likely to be unemployed. 
The unemployment rate of visible minority newcomer women (9.7%) is higher 
than that of visible minority (8.5%) and non-visible minority (6.4%) newcomer 
men, based on the 2016 Census.
 
Related product 
 
· Backgrounder—New partners selected to support visible minority newcomer 
women 

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/06/
new-partners-selected-to-support-visible-minority-newcomer-women.html 


Associated link:
 
· Supporting Visible Minority Newcomer Women
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2018/12/
supporting-visible-minority-newcomer-women.html 


Follow us:
 
· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/

 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
 
 
More..Posted: Jun 07, 2019
Proposed Change to the Oath of Citizenship
Proposed change to the Oath of Citizenship

To recognize rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples
 
May 28, 2019 – Ottawa – The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship, today introduced Bill C-99, An Act to amend 
the Citizenship Act, to change Canada’s Oath of Citizenship to include clear 
reference to the rights of Indigenous peoples.
 
The proposed amendment to the Oath reflects the Government of Canada’s 
commitment to reconciliation, and a renewed relationship with Indigenous peoples 
based on recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. 
It also demonstrates the Government’s commitment to responding to the Calls to 
Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
 
The new proposed language adds references to Canada’s Constitution 
and the Aboriginal and treaty rights of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples:
“I swear (or affirm) that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to Her Majesty 
Queen Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Canada, Her Heirs and Successors, 
and that I will faithfully observe the laws of Canada, including the Constitution, 
which recognizes and affirms the Aboriginal and treaty rights of First Nations, 
Inuit and Métis peoples, and fulfil my duties as a Canadian citizen”.
Taking the Oath of Citizenship is the last step before receiving Canadian 
citizenship. The Oath of Citizenship is a solemn promise to follow the laws of 
Canada and to perform the new citizen’s duties as a Canadian citizen. 
It is a public declaration that the new citizen is joining the Canadian family 
and that the new citizen is committed to Canadian values and traditions.
 
Quote 
 
“The change to the Oath is an important step on our path to reconciliation 
with Indigenous peoples in Canada. It will encourage new Canadians to learn 
about Indigenous peoples and their history, which will help them to fully 
appreciate and respect the significant role of Indigenous peoples in forming 
Canada’s fabric and identity.”
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action are an important 
roadmap for all levels of government, civil society, education and health care 
institutions, and the private sector to ensure Indigenous people included as we 
build a stronger Canada together. The change to the Oath of Citizenship 
introduced today responds to Call to Action No. 94 and demonstrates to 
all Canadians, including to our newest citizens, that Indigenous and treaty rights 
are not just important to Canada—they are an essential part of our country’s 
character.”
– The Honourable Carolyn Bennett, Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations
 
“Reconciliation with First Nations, the Inuit and the Métis is not only 
an Indigenous issue; it’s a Canadian issue. It will take partners at all levels to 
move reconciliation forward. Today, we are advancing that partnership by 
proposing that all Canadians make a solemn promise to respect Indigenous rights 
when they recite the Oath of Citizenship.”
– The Honourable Seamus O’Regan, Minister of Indigenous Services
 
"I welcome the Government's new legislation to change the Oath of Citizenship to 
better reflect a more inclusive history of Canada, as recommended by the Truth 
and Reconciliation Commission in its final report. To understand what it means to 
be Canadian, it is important to know about the three founding 
peoples—the Indigenous people, the French and the British. Reconciliation 
requires that a new vision, based on a commitment to mutual respect, 
be developed. Part of that vision is encouraging all Canadians, including 
newcomers, to understand the history of First Nations, the Métis and the Inuit, 
including information about the treaties and the history of the residential schools, 
so that we all honour the truth and work together to build a more inclusive 
Canada."
–   The Honourable Murray Sinclair, Senator
 
Quick facts:  
 
· The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Final Report states: “Precisely 
because ‘we are all Treaty people,’ Canada’s Oath of Citizenship must include 
a solemn promise to respect Aboriginal and Treaty rights”.  

· The Government consulted extensively with national Indigenous organizations 
on amendments to the Oath of Citizenship.

· Section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 recognizes rights – including both 
Aboriginal rights and treaty rights – of Indigenous peoples (section 35 speaks of 
the Aboriginal peoples of Canada). Section 35 protects the practices and customs 
that are at the centre of Indigenous culture and traditions. The rights covered by 
section 35 include hunting and fishing rights, land rights and self-government 
rights. 
 
· Canada supports the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous 
Peoples. The Declaration recognizes Indigenous peoples’ human rights, 
as well as rights to self-determination, language, equality and land.  
 
· Today, more than 1.6 million people, or nearly 5% of Canada’s population, 
are Indigenous.
 
Related product 
                                                  
BACKGROUNDER: Oath of Citizenship 
 
Associated link:
 
· Becoming A Canadian
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
canadian-citizenship/become-canadian-citizen.html 

Follow us: 

· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada 
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/ 
 
Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
More..Posted: Jun 01, 2019
Canada Introduces New Measures for Vulnerable Individuals
Canada introduces new measures for vulnerable individuals
Protecting people from abuse and violence & reuniting families
 
May 31, 2019—Winnipeg, MB – Canada is taking action to help protect vulnerable 
workers,  newcomers who face family abuse, and help newcomers sponsor family 
members that they didn’t initially declare.
 
Every worker in Canada is entitled to a safe and healthy work environment where 
their rights are respected. Some migrant workers with employer-specific work 
permits end up enduring mistreatment, fearful of workplace punishment, 
as well as fear of losing their job. 
 
Starting June 4, 2019, migrant workers who have an employer-specific work 
permit and are in an abusive job situation in Canada will be able to apply for 
an open work permit. This will allow migrant workers to leave that employer 
immediately, maintain their status and find another job. 
 
Nobody should have to stay in an abusive situation. Some individuals fear 
jeopardizing their immigration status more than an abusive spouse or partner. 
 
Starting July 26, 2019, newcomers experiencing family violence will be able to 
apply for a fee exempt temporary resident permit that will give them legal 
immigration status in Canada and includes a work permit and health care 
coverage. 
 
In addition, we are expediting the process for those in urgent situations of family 
violence who apply for permanent residence on humanitarian and compassionate 
grounds. 
 
When a person applies to immigrate to Canada, they are required to declare 
all of their family members. The consequence for failing to declare a family 
member is a lifetime bar on the principal applicant being able to sponsor that 
family member in the future. 
 
As of September 9, 2019, we will launch a 2-year pilot project where a person 
(resettled refugee, was conferred refugee protection in Canada or were 
themselves sponsored as a spouse, partner or dependent child) who came to 
Canada can now sponsor undeclared immediate family members.
 
The Government is committed to protecting vulnerable people so they can leave 
abusive work or family relationships, or reunite with immediate family members.
 
Quote 
 
“Newcomers who failed to declare immediate family members as they first came to 
Canada were barred to sponsor them. Today, we right that wrong. No worker 
should fear losing their job when they are being mistreated in their place of work. 
No partner should be more fearful of losing their immigration status instead of 
escaping abuse. Today, we say, fear no more.”
 
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
Quick facts: 
 
· When an application is approved for an open work permit for a vulnerable 
worker, the employer will also face an employer compliance inspection. To date, 
more than 160 employers have been found non-compliant and received 
a monetary penalty and/or a ban on hiring foreign workers. Cases that involve 
potentially criminal behaviour are referred to Canada Border Services Agency or 
the appropriate police force.
· The expedited temporary resident permit process for victims of family violence is 
only available to foreign nationals in Canada who have not yet obtained their 
permanent residence and whose status in Canada is dependent on their abusive 
spouse or partner. It is not available to foreign nationals outside Canada.
· The pilot project for sponsorship of previously undeclared family members 
will last 2 years – from September 9, 2019, to September 9, 2021. Applications 
that are already in process will also benefit from this pilot project.
 
Associated links:
 
· Canada Gazette, Part II, Volume 153, Number 11
http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2019/2019-05-29/html/sor-dors148-eng.html

· Employers who have been found non-compliant
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/work-canada/
employers-non-compliant.html

· Help for spouses and partners who are victims of abuse
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
immigrate-canada/family-sponsorship/abuse.html

 
Follow us: 
· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada  
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/


Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
*
More..Posted: Jun 01, 2019
Minister Hussen and Special Advisor Boissonnault to Make An Announcement As Part of the Launch of Pride Season
Minister Hussen and Special Advisor Boissonnault to make an announcement 
as part of the launch of Pride Season
 
Toronto, ON – The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship, and Randy Boissonnault, Special Advisor to 
the Prime Minister on LGBTQ2 Issues and Member of Parliament for Edmonton 
Centre, will be available to media following an announcement related to 
vulnerable refugees around the world.  
 
Date: Saturday, June 1, 2019
                         
Time: 11:00 a.m. (local time)
 
Place: Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto

115 Simpson Ave, 
Toronto, ON 
M4K 1A1

For more information (media only):
 
Mathieu Genest
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship
819-639-3686
 
Media Relations
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
National Headquarters
613-952-1650 
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
More..Posted: Jun 01, 2019
50,000 Petitions to be Delivered to Immigration Minister in Support of Migrant Student Facing Deportation
50,000 petitions to be delivered to Immigration Minister in support of 
Migrant Student Facing Deportation

Toronto, May 23, 2019 -- Hundreds of people are expected to converge 
at Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen’s constituency office at 10:30am, Friday, 
May 24, 2019 to deliver a petition in support of Jobandeep Singh Sandhu, 
and to call for permanent resident status on arrival for all migrants and students. 
Many are also calling for an end to rules that limit migrant students ability to work. 
Jobandeep Singh Sandhu was arrested two years ago by the OPP without having 
broken any criminal laws, and handed over to immigration enforcement. 
It is unclear if racial profiling was involved or how the OPP came to know that 
Mr Sandhu was at that time working more than the 20 hours per week that his 
permit allowed. Mr Sandhu’s story has touched a nerve with hundreds of students 
coming forward to complain about abuse and mistreatment. 50,000 people having 
signed the petition in just one week.

WHEN: 10:30am, Friday, May 24, 2019
WHERE: 99 Ingram Drive, Toronto, Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen’s 
constituency office
WHO: Jobandeep Singh, his family members, friends, members of Toronto’s 
Punjabi community, international students and Migrant Workers Alliance for 
Change
VISUALS: 50,000 petitions to be delivered to Immigration Minister, hundreds of 
people. 

BACKGROUND
Petition can be found online at: https://you.leadnow.ca/p/Joban

Migrant Workers Alliance for Change (MWAC) is Canada’s largest migrant workers 
rights coalition organizing non permanent resident workers in low-waged I
ndustries. MWAC includes individuals as well as Asian Community Aids Services, 
Butterfly (Asian and Migrant Sex Workers Support), 
Caregiver Connections Education and Support Organization, Caregivers Action 
Centre, Chinese Canadian National Council - Toronto, Durham Region Migrant 
Solidarity Network, FCJ Refugee House, GABRIELA Ontario, IAVGO Community 
Legal Clinic, Income Security Advocacy Centre, Migrante Ontario, 
No One Is Illegal – Toronto, Northumberland Community Legal Centre, 
OCASI – Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, OHIP For All, 
PCLS Community Legal Clinic, SALCO Community Legal Clinic, 
Students Against Migrant Exploitation, UFCW, UNIFOR, Workers’ Action Centre 
and Workers United. 
© Bell Canada, 2019. All rights reserved.

Media Contact: Syed Hussan, Coordinator, Migrant Workers Alliance for Change, 
416 453 3632, 
hussan@migrantworkersalliance.org 

More..Posted: May 23, 2019
Canada Ends the Designated Country of Origin practice
Canada ends the Designated Country of Origin practice

Canada removes all countries from the designated country of origin list

May 17, 2019—Ottawa, ON—The Government of Canada is committed to 
a well-managed asylum system that’s fair, fast and final. Effective today,
Canada is removing all countries from the designated country of origin (DCO) list, 
which effectively suspends the DCO policy, introduced in 2012, until it can be 
repealed through future legislative changes.
 
Claimants from the 42 countries on the DCO list were previously subject to 
a 6-month bar on work permits, a bar on appeals at the Refugee Appeals Division, 
limited access to the Interim Federal Health Program and a 36-month bar on 
the Pre-Removal Risk Assessment.
 
The DCO policy did not fulfil its objective of discouraging misuse of the asylum 
system and of processing refugee claims from these countries faster. Additionally, 
several Federal Court decisions struck down certain provisions of the DCO policy, 
ruling that they did not comply with the Canadian Charter of Rights 
and Freedoms.
 
Removing all countries from the DCO list is a Canadian policy change, 
not a reflection of a change in country conditions in any of the countries previously 
on the list. 
 
De-designating countries of origin has no impact on the Canada-U.S. Safe Third 
Country Agreement.
 
Quote
 
“We are keeping our promise to Canadians and taking another important step 
towards building an asylum system that’s both fair and efficient while helping 
the most vulnerable people in the world.”
 
—    The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
Quick facts 

· Claimants from former DCOs who are awaiting a decision on their claim 
need not take any action. The Immigration and Refugee Board will continue to 
process these claims as efficiently as possible. 
· Each asylum claim is unique and is determined in accordance with the law by 
an independent decision-maker based on the evidence presented, 
and the individual merits of the case.
· De-designating countries of origin has no impact on:
o   visa policy decisions.
o   the outcomes of decisions at the independent Immigration and Refugee 
Board of Canada. 
· Asylum claims continue to be decided on the basis of an assessment of 
the merits of the individual’s claim. 
· From January 1, 2013, to March 31, 2019, 12 percent of asylum claims were 
from citizens of designated countries of origin.
· Budget 2019 announced $208 million to increase the capacity of the asylum 
system and shorten wait times at the Immigration and Refugee Board. 
This is the largest-ever investment into the IRB and builds on funding announced 
in Budget 2018, as well as a series of measures implemented to improve 
the efficiency of the asylum system following an independent review. 
 
Associated links:

· Designated countries of origin policy
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/
claim-protection-inside-canada/apply/designated-countries-policy.html

· Backgrounder – Investing in Canada’s Asylum System
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/05/
investing-in-canadas-asylum-system.html

· The Immigration and Refugee Board Clears its Legacy backlog
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugee/news/2019/04/the-irbs-legacy-
task-force-clears-its-backlog.html

· Making a claim for refugee protection? Here’s what you should know
https://irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/information-sheets/Pages/refugee-protection.aspx

· Less Complex Claims: The short-hearing and file-review processes
 https://irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/information-sheets/Pages/less-complex-claims.aspx

Contacts for media only
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
 
More..Posted: May 17, 2019
Canada Soccer’s Women’s National Team Welcomes New Canadians
Canada Soccer’s Women’s National Team welcomes new Canadians

From: Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada 
New citizens to be featured at Saturday’s game
May 17, 2019 – Toronto – Canada Soccer hosted a special citizenship ceremony 
at BMO Field today, where Canada’s Women’s National Team welcomed 27 new 
citizens from 12 countries into the Canadian family.
The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship, delivered the oath of citizenship and presented certificates to 
the new citizens. Also attending was Peter Montopoli, Canada Soccer’s General 
Secretary.
Citizenship Judge Rodney Simmons presided over the ceremony. Immediately 
after the swearing-in, the new Canadians took to the field to meet with Canada’s 
Women’s National Team.
The new citizens and their guests will be back at BMO Field on Saturday, 
May 18, 2019, to cheer on Canada as they play against Mexico at 1 p.m. 
Team Canada will then head to France to compete for the FIFA Women’s World 
Cup.
The collaboration between Canada Soccer and Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship Canada complements the department’s #ImmigrationMatters 
initiative. Immigration Matters aims to demonstrate the benefits of immigration to 
Canadian communities and promote positive engagement between newcomers 
and Canadians.

Quotes

“Canada’s sporting culture has and continues to play a significant role in enriching 
the multicultural fabric of our country, where everyone can come together to 
watch a game and cheer Canada and their country of origin. It was such 
an honour to welcome our newest Canadians alongside members of Canada 
Soccer’s Women’s National Team. To our country’s 27 newest citizens, welcome to 
the Canadian family. Good luck to our women forming Team Canada as they gear 
up for the Women’s World Cup, we will be cheering you on”.
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
“The parallels between the world’s game and Canada are numerous. Canada 
provides a welcoming, inclusive, and diverse society. Soccer celebrates cultures, 
encourages teamwork and collaboration, and provides a platform for everyone to 
come together under a common goal. We are proud to celebrate with these new 
Canadians as they become citizens of this welcoming nation and encourage them 
to participate in the beautiful game”.
– Peter Montopoli, Canada Soccer General Secretary

Quick facts

The citizenship ceremony is a significant milestone in the immigration 
and settlement process for newcomers to Canada. Taking the oath of citizenship is 
a necessary legal step to being granted Canadian citizenship.
Over the last 10 years, Canada has welcomed nearly 1.7 million new Canadians, 
more than 875,000 of them women and girls. In 2018 alone, 
more than 175,000 people — including 90,000 women and girls — became 
Canadian.
Gender equality has been a primary goal of the Government of Canada 
and is included in Budget 2019.
Canada’s Women’s National Team is participating for the 7th consecutive time in 
the FIFA Women’s World Cup.
Soccer is the largest participatory team sport in Canada and is considered 
the fastest growing sport in the country. There are nearly 1,000,000 registered 
Canada Soccer active participants in Canada within 1,200 clubs that operate in 
13 provincial/territorial member associations.

Associated links

#ImmigrationMatters 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/
immigration-matters.html

Become a Canadian Citizen 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/
canadian-citizenship/become-canadian-citizen.html

Photos - special citizenship ceremony at BMO Field hosted by Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship Canada and Canada Soccer 
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/photos.html

Contacts

Contacts for media only
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
 

 
More..Posted: May 17, 2019
Statement in Response to the Auditor General of Canada’s Report on Processing Asylum Claims
Statement in response to the Auditor General of Canada’s report on processing 
asylum claims
 
Ottawa, May 7, 2019 – The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship, the Honourable Bill Blair, Minister of Border Security 
and Organized Crime Reduction and the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of 
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, today issued the following 
statement:

“We welcome the Auditor General of Canada’s report and agree with its 
recommendations, which offer important insights that will allow us to continue 
improving the asylum system.

We have taken measures to ensure the integrity of our borders, while offering 
protection to the world’s most vulnerable people.
 
Since the Second World War, there has never been as many people displaced 
across the globe. Countries have had to adapt quickly to offer a safe haven to 
the world’s most vulnerable people. Canada is no exception.
 
The government has made significant investments in the asylum system, including 
in Budget 2018, which provided funding of $74 million over 2 years, 
starting in 2018 to 2019, for the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) to increase 
processing capacity, improve governance, and increase efficiencies. 
 
Further, Budget 2019 proposes to invest up to $1.18 billion over 5 years, 
starting in 2019 to 2020, and $55 million per year ongoing. This investment 
will increase the capacity of Canada’s asylum system to process 50,000 claims 
a year and strengthen processes at the border, including timely removals. 
This will achieve multiple goals by granting protection faster to people who need it, 
while maintaining the integrity of our borders and immigration system
 
In terms of the report’s recommendations, the Government has already:
· created an Asylum System Management Board, which brings together senior 
officials from Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, the Canada Border 
Services Agency, and the Immigration and Refugee Board to set joint priorities, 
monitor trends and system performance, and ensure better horizontal coordination
· piloted an Integrated Claims Analysis Centre that co-locates employees from 
all 3 organizations to proactively share information in support of program integrity 
and provide a single report to the IRB so it can make decisions more quickly, and 
· significantly reduced hearing postponements by realigning scheduling practices 
and investing in the IRB’s capacity to hear claims
Many of these proposals are consistent with the 2018 Independent Review of 
the Immigration and Refugee Board to examine opportunities to gain efficiencies, 
and with the Auditor General’s report.

We are also tackling the root causes of international irregular migration. 
Canada has led the way on the Global Compact on Migration, which will allow 
the international community to collaborate in helping resolve some of 
the underlying issues that force people to leave their home. 
 
We will continue to ensure that Canada processes asylum claims in a way that is 
consistent with its international obligations, while also safeguarding the integrity of 
our immigration system and the safety of our citizens”. 
 
For further information (media only), please contact:
 
Mathieu Genest
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064 
 
Media Relations          
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca 
 
 
 
 
 
 
More..Posted: May 10, 2019