Minister Duclos Releases Report on Nationwide Engagement to Reduce Poverty
Minister Duclos releases report on nationwide engagement to reduce poverty

QUÉBEC, Feb. 20, 2018 /CNW/ - Over the past year, the Government of Canada 
has travelled across the country, engaging with thousands of Canadians, especially 
those who have lived experience with poverty, to hear their stories, ideas 
and feedback about reducing poverty. Today the Honourable Jean Yves Duclos, 
Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, announced the release of 
the What We Heard report, a summary of the feedback gathered during 
the Poverty Reduction Strategy engagement process.
Many of the experiences and stories shared by Canadians are captured in 
the report, reflecting the diverse needs of Canadians affected by poverty. 
The report covers issues such as the inability to meet basic needs, challenges with
joining the middle class, risks of slipping into poverty, experiences of First Nation, 
Inuit and Métis people, service delivery and targets and indicators.
Canadians are concerned about their future and the future of their children. They 
want to see real, tangible results from their government with solutions that address 
the root causes of poverty. This will require bold and measurable solutions that are 
inclusive and work to address different aspects of poverty faced by Canadians, 
as well as setting measurable targets to reduce poverty. The invaluable feedback 
gathered during the engagement process will help to inform the ongoing work to 
develop the first-ever Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Quote

"I am pleased to release the What We Heard report, which I believe is a great step 
towards a better understanding of poverty in Canada. I am grateful for the level of 
commitment demonstrated by all those who participated and am honoured to help 
turn results of this engagement process into positive change as we develop 
a Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy. It is by working together that we can 
make a difference in reducing poverty in our communities, and help all Canadians 
have a real and fair chance to succeed."
– The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social 
Development

Quick Facts

ESDC engaged with more than 8,000 Canadians from across the country. This 
included:
• more than 1,950 emails and online submissions;
• community-led engagement sessions with over 600 Canadians in nine different 
provinces and territories;
• 13 Government of Canada officials-led sessions;
• 12 roundtables with stakeholders and four roundtables with Indigenous 
leadership;
• 4 public town hall events (one of which was broadcast live via Facebook);
• the Tackling Poverty Together Project, an in-depth study of poverty in six 
communities across Canada, reached over 5,500 Canadians;
• 64 submissions received through the #ReducePoverty in Canada youth contest 
and
• a National Poverty Conference with approximately 150 stakeholders from across 
the country.

Associated Links

What We Heard report 
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/
poverty-reduction/reports/proverty-reduction-strategy-what-we-heard.html

Poverty Reduction Strategy 
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/campaigns/
poverty-reduction.html

Tackling Poverty Together report
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/
poverty-reduction/reports/tackling-poverty-together.html

Backgrounder

Poverty Reduction Strategy Engagement Process
Through the engagement process the Government reached out through in-person 
roundtables, public town halls and online forums. Thousands of Canadians 
responded with surveys, shared stories and email submissions. The department 
compiled research information and feedback from First Nations, Inuit and Métis 
people, academics, researchers, stakeholders, service delivery organizations, 
youth and people with lived experience of poverty.
Engagement with First Nation, Inuit and Métis people
In keeping with Canada's commitment to renewed relationships with Indigenous 
peoples based on the recognition of rights, respect, co-operation and partnership, 
Indigenous-specific engagement was also undertaken. The Government met with 
First Nations, Inuit and Métis leadership, held ministerial roundtables and facilitated 
engagement sessions with Indigenous communities and organizations. 
The Government also provided funding for engagement projects that were 
conducted by the Assembly of First Nations, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, Métis National 
Council, Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, and the Native Women's Association of 
Canada.
Tackling Poverty Together Research Project
As part of the engagement, the Tackling Poverty Together research project 
conducted extensive case studies with people in six cities across 
Canada–particularly those with experience of poverty–to closely examine 
the impact of federal poverty reduction programs locally. A report on key findings 
was released last fall and is available on Canada.ca.
#ReducePoverty in Canada Youth Contest
The Government called for ideas to #ReducePoverty in Canada through a contest 
for youth aged 12 to 24 years old, and young Canadians from across the country 
responded. Five innovative, passionate and inspired entries were chosen to be 
presented at the National Poverty Conference in Ottawa, Ontario last September, 
and can be seen on Canada.ca.
Ministerial Advisory Committee on Poverty
The Ministerial Advisory Committee on Poverty is composed of 17 leaders from 
academia, business and service delivery working in the field of poverty reduction, 
as well as individuals who have experienced poverty first-hand. The Committee 
members provide expertise and independent advice to the Minister.
National Poverty Conference
On September 27-28, 2017, the National Poverty Conference brought together 
academics, stakeholders, researchers, front-line service providers, people with 
lived experience of poverty, youth and members of the Advisory Committee on 
Poverty to discuss what was heard from Canadians during the engagement 
process.
Follow us on Twitter
 
SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada
For further information:
For media enquiries, please contact: Émilie Gauduchon-Campbell, Press Secretary, 
Office of the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, P.C., M.P., Minister of Families, 
Children and Social Development, 
819-654-5546; 

Media Relations Office, 
Employment and Social Development Canada, 
819-994-5559, 
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
This information is being distributed to you by CNW Group Ltd. 88 Queens Quay 
West, Suite 3000 Toronto ON M5J 0B8
www.newswire.ca 
2017 CNW Group Ltd, all rights reserved 

More..Posted: Feb 20, 2018
Government of Canada Makes Post-Secondary Education More Affordable for Part-Time Students
Government of Canada makes post-secondary education more affordable for 
part-time students

BURNABY, BC, Feb. 20, 2018 /CNW/ - Making post-secondary education more 
affordable for Canadians is how we will continue growing our middle class 
and strengthening our economy. When Canadians have the opportunity to go to 
school or access training while better balancing family responsibilities, they are 
better placed to find and keep good jobs. That's why today, Terry Beech, Member 
of Parliament for Burnaby North–Seymour and Parliamentary Secretary to 
the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard on behalf of 
the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development 
and Labour, highlighted expanded access to Canada Student Grants for part-time 
students.
Starting this academic year, nearly 10,000 more part-time students from low- 
and middle-income families will benefit from up to $1,800 in non repayable grants 
per year and up to $10,000 in loans. Additionally, access to grants for part-time 
students with children will be expanded allowing them to benefit from up to $1,920 
per year in grants.  
Expanded access to Canada Student Grants for full-time and part-time students 
and students with dependants helps more Canadians afford post-secondary 
education. These measures will benefit Canadian women in particular, who often 
strive to improve their career prospects while balancing family responsibilities. 
Women represent nearly two thirds of the Canada Student Loans Program's 
part-time recipients, while approximately four out of five students receiving 
the Canada Student Grant for students with dependent children are women.

Quotes

"Helping more Canadians afford post-secondary education will help grow our 
economy and strengthen the middle class. Far too many Canadians face challenges 
when pursuing post-secondary education—not only because of the cost of 
education itself but also because of the financial pressures and time constraints of 
supporting our families. Our government has Canadians covered, no matter their 
circumstance—whether they are going to college or university for the first time, 
returning to school or upgrading their skills." 
– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development 
and Labour
"The British Columbia Institute of Technology has always supported unique paths to 
post-secondary education. As we empower our students to embrace the challenges 
of a complex world, we work alongside the government and our industry partners 
to enhance education access opportunities for all learners."
– Kathy Kinloch, President, British Columbia Institute of Technology

Quick Facts

• The Government of Canada is investing:
o $107.4 million over four years, starting in 2018–19, and $29.3 million per year 
thereafter, to expand eligibility for Canada Student Grants for students with 
dependants.
o $59.8 million over four years, starting in 2018–19, and $17 million per year 
thereafter to expand eligibility for Canada Student Grants for Part-Time Students 
and to increase the threshold for eligibility for Canada Student Loans for part-time 
students.
• Expanded access to Canada Student Grants for students with dependants, 
starting in the 2018–19 academic year, allows more:
o full-time students with children to receive up to $200 per month per child; and
o part-time students with children to receive up to $1,920 per year in grants.

Associated Links

Student Financial Assistance
https://www.canada.ca/en/services/jobs/education/student-financial-aid.html

Budget 2016: Growing the Middle-Class 
https://www.budget.gc.ca/2016/docs/plan/toc-tdm-en.html

Budget 2017: Building a Strong Middle-Class 
https://www.budget.gc.ca/2017/home-accueil-en.html

Follow us on Twitter 
https://twitter.com/MinWorkDev


Backgrounder

Canada Student Loans Program
The Canada Student Loans Program helps to make post-secondary education more 
affordable for students from low- and middle-income families by providing supports 
to students with financial need through grants, loans and repayment assistance 
measures.

• Canada Student Grants provide non-repayable funding to full- and part-time 
students and are targeted to students from low- and middle-income families, 
students with permanent disabilities and students with dependants. Students
 are automatically assessed for Canada Student Grants when applying for student 
financial assistance through their province or territory of residence. 
• Canada Student Loans are offered by the Government of Canada to help eligible 
full- and part-time students pay for post-secondary education at designated 
academic institutions throughout Canada and abroad. 
• The Repayment Assistance Plan makes it easier for students who are experiencing 
financial difficulties to repay their student loans. Under the Repayment Assistance 
Plan, monthly payments are limited to no more than 20 percent of a borrower's 
family income and no borrower has a repayment period of more than 15 years. 
To remain eligible, borrowers must re-apply every six months.
Budget 2016
Budget 2016 invested more than $2.7 billion over five years to introduce important 
changes to the Canada Student Loans Program that expanded financial assistance 
measures for Canadians by:
• Increasing Canada Student Grant amounts by 50 percent, starting on 
August 1, 2016, which expanded available grant support for students from low- 
and middle-income families. More specifically, grants were increased from:
o $2,000 to $3,000 per year for students from low-income families;
o $800 to $1,200 per year for students from middle-income families; and
o $1,200 to up to $1,800 per year for part-time students from low-income families. 
• Increasing the Repayment Assistance Plan eligibility thresholds, starting on 
November 1, 2016, to ensure that no student has to repay their Canada Student 
Loan until they are earning at least $25,000 per year. The threshold increases 
based on family size, being responsive to the financial realities of Canadians who 
may be married or in a common-law relationship and have children. 
• Introducing a new fixed student contribution, starting on August 1, 2017, 
eliminating the need for students to report estimates of their future income or their 
financial assets when applying for grants and loans. Students are instead expected 
to make a fixed contribution of between $1,500 and $3,000 towards their 
post-secondary education costs each year, based on their family income and size. 
This enables students to work and gain valuable work experience without worrying 
about a reduction in their level of financial assistance and particularly benefits 
working Canadians, many of whom may work while studying or have accumulated 
assets.
o Students facing barriers to employment, including those with children, 
are exempted from making a contribution, thereby expanding their access to 
support from the Canada Student Loans Program.
o As part of this change, the contributions expected of students' spouses or 
common-law partners were relaxed, further expanding eligibility for working 
Canadians who are more likely to be married or in a common-law relationship.
• Expanding eligibility for Canada Student Grants. Starting on August 1, 2017, 
the existing income thresholds, which presently vary by province and territory, 
were replaced with a higher, single national threshold. As family income increases, 
the amount of grant support received will gradually decline, depending on family 
size.

Budget 2017: Skills Boost
Budget 2017 introduced measures to provide enhanced student financial assistance 
and make better use of Employment Insurance flexibilities targeted to working or 
unemployed Canadians looking to return to school to upgrade their skills. Together, 
these initiatives comprise Skills Boost.
Student Financial Assistance Measures
Budget 2017 builds on measures implemented as part of Budget 2016, including 
further enhancements to the supports available to working Canadians by investing 
$454.4 million over four years to:
• Introduce a three-year pilot project for adult learners that will, starting in 
the 2018–19 academic year:

o provide top-up funding of an additional $1,600 per year in grant support to 
students who have been out of high school for at least 10 years and are returning 
to full-time post-secondary studies; and
o give flexibility to assess grant eligibility based on the current year's income 
(rather than for the previous year) in recognition of a significant change in financial 
circumstances.
• Expand eligibility for part-time grants and loans, starting in the 2018–19 
academic 
year, allowing more students from low- and middle-income families to benefit from 
up to $1,800 in non repayable grants per year and up to $10,000 in loans.
• Expand access to grants for students with children, starting in the 2018–19 
academic year, allowing more:
o full-time students with children to receive up to $200 per month per child; and
o part-time students with children to receive up to $1,920 per year in grants.
To receive Canada Student Grants, students must apply to their province or 
territory of residence to receive financial assistance for the 2018–19 school year. 
For example, as of November 8, 2017, students in Ontario can start applying to 
the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) to receive both provincial 
and federal assistance for the 2018–19 academic year. Students who have already 
applied for OSAP will be eligible for this funding. Students in other jurisdictions 
(with the exception of the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Quebec) will be 
eligible to apply for the student aid components of Skills Boost when their provincial 
or territorial student financial assistance office launches its application period for 
the 2018-2019 school year.
Employment Insurance measures
Employment Insurance (EI) regular benefits provides temporary income support to 
eligible individuals who lose their job through no fault of their own (for example, 
due to shortage of work) and are available for and able to work, but can't find 
a job.
As part of Skills Boost, Budget 2017 announced an investment of $132.4 million 
over four years, starting in 2018–19, and $37.9 million thereafter, to make better 
use of existing flexibilities within the EI program that allow claimants to pursue 
training while receiving EI benefits.
Under existing rules, EI claimants can take self-funded training and receive their EI 
benefits when they continue to meet program requirements (i.e. search and be 
available for work). They may also be referred to full-time training by designated 
authorities (i.e. provinces, territories and Indigenous organizations), and continue 
to receive their EI benefits. This referred training may be self-funded or paid for by 
the designated authority.
Starting in fall 2018, more opportunities will be provided for those who lose their
 jobs after several years in the workforce to pursue full-time training at their own 
expense while continuing to receive their EI benefits. 
 
SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada
For further information:
For media enquiries, please contact: Matt Pascuzzo, Press Secretary, Office of 
the Honourable Patty Hajdu, P.C., M.P., Minister of Employment, Workforce 
Development and Labour, 
matt.pascuzzo@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 
819-654-4183; 

Media Relations Office, Employment and Social Development Canada, 
819-994-5559, 
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
This information is being distributed to you by CNW Group Ltd. 88 Queens Quay 
West, Suite 3000 Toronto ON M5J 0B8
www.newswire.ca 
2017 CNW Group Ltd, all rights reserved 

More..Posted: Feb 20, 2018
Government of Canada Provides Skills Training and Job Opportunities for Young Canadians in the Nunavik Region of Quebec
Government of Canada provides skills training and job opportunities for young 
Canadians in the Nunavik region of Quebec

KUUJJUAQ, QC, Feb. 20, 2018 /CNW/ - Building a strong middle class means giving 
Canada's youth the tools they need to find and keep good jobs.
Today, Yvonne Jones, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous 
Relations and Northern Affairs, on behalf of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister 
of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, announced a new project that
will give youth in Quebec's Nunavik region job skills training and hands-on work 
experience.
Up to 100 youth will benefit from the Pijunnaqunga project, which will be delivered 
by the Kativik Regional Government, thanks to more than $2.1 million in 
Government of Canada funding through the Skills Link Program. Youth will receive 
two-weeks of training to enhance foundational job skills such as teamwork 
and communication. Following training, they will be connected with local employers 
to acquire hands-on work experience in fields such as administration and customer 
service. Participants will also receive action plans to help them take concrete steps 
to improve their ability to find and keep good jobs. 
Skills Link supports projects that help young people who face more barriers to 
employment than others develop basic employability skills and gain valuable job 
experience, which in turn assists them in making a successful transition into 
the workforce or to return to school. These youth could include those who have not 
completed high school, single parents, Indigenous youth, youth with disabilities, 
youth living in rural or remote areas or newcomers.

Quotes

"We know that our communities are healthier and stronger when everyone can fully 
participate. Supporting youth as they transition into the workforce and providing 
them with the training they need to succeed is a key way in which we can grow our 
economy and strengthen the middle class." 
– The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Employment, Workforce Development 
and Labour
"I am thrilled to highlight projects like these, which provide foundational training 
and experience to youth. The Pijunnaqunga project  will make a real difference in 
the lives of youth in Nunavik as they continue school or start their careers." 
– Yvonne Jones, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Crown-Indigenous 
Relations
"With its unique approach, the Pijunnaqunga program allows young Inuit adults to 
discover their own path and find job opportunities suiting their skills. This 
announcement is a major step in the right direction for the next generation of 
Nunavimmiut leaders, and we are confident that the new funding will directly 
benefit our youth by developing their aptitudes and enabling their participation in 
the Nunavik labour market."
– Jennifer Munick, Chairperson of the Kativik Regional Government

Quick Facts

• Each year, the Government invests more than $330 million in the Youth 
Employment Strategy to help young people gain the skills, abilities and work 
experience they need to find and maintain good employment.
• Budget 2016 invested an additional $165.4 million in the Youth Employment 
Strategy in 2016–17.
• Budget 2017 invested an additional $395.5 million over three years in the Youth 
Employment Strategy, starting in 2017–18. Combined with Budget 2016 measures, 
these investments will help:
o more than 33,000 vulnerable youth develop the skills they need to find work or go 
back to school;
o create 15,000 new green jobs for youth; and
o provide over 1,600 new employment opportunities for youth in the heritage 
sector.

Associated Links

Youth Employment Strategy 
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/funding/
youth-employment-strategy.html

Skills Link Program 
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/funding/
skills-link.html

Follow us on Twitter
https://twitter.com/Jobs_Emplois
 
SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada
For further information:
Matt Pascuzzo, Press Secretary, Office of the Honourable Patty Hajdu, P.C., M.P., 
Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, 
matt.pascuzzo@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca, 
819-654-5613; 

Media Relations Office, Employment and Social Development Canada, 
819-994-5559, 
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
This information is being distributed to you by CNW Group Ltd. 88 Queens Quay 
West, Suite 3000 Toronto ON M5J 0B8
www.newswire.ca 
2017 CNW Group Ltd, all rights reserved 
   
More..Posted: Feb 20, 2018
Government of Canada Creates Equal Access and Opportunities for People with Disabilities
Government of Canada creates equal access and opportunities for people with 
disabilities

GATINEAU, QC, Feb. 16, 2018 /CNW/ - Canadians with disabilities face challenges 
every day that prevent them from participating fully in all aspects of our society, 
and our government is taking action to break down these barriers.
Today, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport 
and Persons with Disabilities, announced the approval of approximately 
600 Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) projects for a total of $15.5 million. Through 
programs such as the EAF, the Government of Canada is taking action to build 
a more inclusive, accessible and resilient Canada.
The EAF supports community-based projects across Canada aimed at making public 
facilities and workplaces more accessible.
Sixty-four projects were approved under the Workplace Accessibility Stream, with 
funding to improve accessibility and safety in workplaces across Canada through 
capital cost investments.
A total of 529 projects were approved under the Community Accessibility Stream, 
with funding to improve accessibility and safety through renovations, retrofits or 
construction of community facilities and venues so that programs and services can 
be accessed by people with disabilities.  
The newly launched Youth Innovation Component of the EAF saw nine youth-driven 
projects accepted, which will help increase accessibility in community facilities 
and workplaces across Canada. Each project will receive up to $10,000 in funding 
and will empower young leaders to work with organizations of their choice 
and tackle accessibility barriers in their communities.
Quote
"Canada is at its best and all of society benefits when everyone is included, 
and projects like the ones approved through the Enabling Accessibility Fund do just 
that. I am glad to see the enthusiasm for this fund growing each year. Thanks to 
the projects announced today, Canadians with disabilities can fully participate in 
their communities and their workplaces." 
– The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport 
and Persons with Disabilities
Quick Facts
• Since the creation of the Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) in 2007, 
the Government of Canada has funded over 3,000 projects, helping thousands of 
Canadians gain access to their communities' programs, services and workplaces.
• The EAF has an annual (grants and contributions) base budget of $13.65 million.
• Budget 2016 provided an additional $4 million over two years, starting in 
2016–17, for the EAF's community stream to support the capital costs of 
construction and renovation related to improving physical accessibility and safety 
for Canadians with disabilities. This has increased the EAF grants and contributions 
budget to $15.65 million in 2016–17 and 2017–18.
• Starting in 2018–19, the EAF grants and contributions budget will grow to 
$20.65 million, as Budget 2017 provided $77 million ($70 million in grants 
and contributions and $7 million in operational funding) over 10 years to expand 
the activities of the EAF and support more small and mid-sized projects, including 
youth driven proposals, aimed at improving accessibility in Canadian communities 
and workplaces.

Associated Link

Funding: Enabling Accessibility in Workplaces and Communities
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/services/funding/
enabling-accessibility-fund.html

Backgrounder
Enabling Accessibility Fund
The Enabling Accessibility Fund (EAF) is a federal grants and contributions program 
which supports community-based projects across Canada aimed at improving 
accessibility in public facilities and in workplaces.
Funding is provided through two streams: the Workplace Accessibility Stream 
and the Community Accessibility Stream.
The Workplace Accessibility Stream supports projects that improve accessibility 
and safety in workplaces across Canada through capital cost investments 
(i.e. renovation, retrofit or construction of facilities in which job opportunities can 
be created or maintained for people with disabilities). This includes the provision of 
information and communication technologies for community use that eliminate 
systemic accessibility barriers.
The Community Accessibility Stream provides funding to eligible recipients for capital 
cost projects that improve accessibility in public facilities to improve access to 
programs and services for people with disabilities. Projects must be directly related 
to removing barriers and increasing accessibility for people with disabilities in 
Canadian communities.
All projects must respond to specific eligibility criteria.
For further information on the EAF, please visit 
http://www.esdc.gc.ca/eng/disability/eaf/.
Follow us on Twitter
 
SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada
For further information:
For media enquiries, please contact: Annabelle Archambault, Press Secretary, 
Office of the Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, 
819-934-1122 / TTY: 1-866-702-6967, 
annabelle.archambault@canada.ca; 

Media Relations Office, Employment and Social Development Canada, 
819-994-5559, 
media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
This information is being distributed to you by CNW Group Ltd. 88 Queens Quay 
West, Suite 3000 Toronto ON M5J 0B8
www.newswire.ca .
2017 CNW Group Ltd, all rights reserved 
   
More..Posted: Feb 16, 2018
Trudeau Government Must be Transparent on Removal of Romanian Visa Requirements: Rempel
Trudeau Government must be Transparent on Removal of Romanian Visa 
Requirements: Rempel

February 15, 2018
 
OTTAWA, ON – Today, the Honourable Michelle Rempel, Shadow Minister for 
Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship, questioned the Minister of Immigration, 
Refugees and Citizenship’s decision to remove the visa requirement for Romanian 
nationals. Since the visa requirement was lifted in December 2017, there have 
already been 232 asylum claims made in Canada. MP Rempel issued the following 
statement:
 
“This Liberal government has shown time and time again that they are willing to 
put partisan politics and optics before evidence based decision-making. Canada has 
a framework in place in order to determine what counties should be visa-exempt. 
Under the previous Conservative government, this criteria included metrics such 
as an immigration violation rate of less than 3% over 3 years and a refugee claim 
rate of less than 2% of all asylum claims made in Canada. Today, Immigration 
departmental officials refused to tell us what metrics they used in their visa 
determination framework.
 
“Since the visa requirement for Romanian nationals was lifted, we have seen a spike 
in asylum claims being made here in Canada.  Recent reports have also linked 
Romanian nationals to human trafficking rings. Lifting a visa requirement without 
proper safeguards puts the sustainability of our asylum system at risk. It may also
have repercussions for the safety of vulnerable women and girls who could be 
targeted for human trafficking as a result of this ease of movement.
 
“What concerns me the most is that the Minister could not tell us what criteria his 
department used to remove the visa requirement, nor what measures are in place 
to ensure the sustainability of this decision. Today, I am calling on the Trudeau 
government to be transparent with Canadians by providing this critical information 
and to immediately put in place measures to rectify this situation.”
 
For more information: 
 
Office of Hon. Michelle Rempel P.C., M.P.
613-992-4275
Michelle.Rempel.A1@parl.gc.ca
More..Posted: Feb 16, 2018
Universities Join Together to Ispire Students to Use Their Creativity and Innovative Skills to Help Make Communities More Sccessible for People with Disabilities
Universities join together to inspire students to use their creativity and innovative 
skills to help make communities more accessible for people with disabilities

OTTAWA, Feb. 14, 2018 /CNW/ - Today, Stéphane Lauzon, Parliamentary 
Secretary for Sport and Persons with Disabilities, on behalf of the Honourable Kirsty 
Duncan, Minister of Science and Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, 
joined members of Universities Canada to celebrate the upcoming launch of their 
Innovative Designs for Accessibility (IDeA) program, a national student competition 
to help remove barriers to accessibility.
This project will receive $788,783 through the Social Development Partnerships 
Program-Disability component. The Government of Canada encourages all students 
who attend a participating university to take part and share their innovative ideas 
and solutions to accessibility barriers that Canadians with disabilities face in their 
everyday lives.
The official launch of the competition will take place on March 1 and it will be open 
until May 31, 2018.The IDeA program encourages undergraduate students to use 
their creativity to develop innovative, cost-effective and practical solutions to 
accessibility-related issues and make their communities more accessible for people 
with disabilities.
Students will collaborate with industry, government and community partners to 
identify accessibility barriers in the following categories: attitudinal organizational/
systemic; architectural/physical; information or communications; or technology. 
Students can work in teams, or individually, to develop a plan to address the issue 
and to propose a solution. The winners will be showcased at an accessibility or 
innovation themed conference. The competitions are expected to run annually 
until 2020.
Quotes
"What a great initiative by Universities Canada. This is a wonderful opportunity for 
students, and I encourage all of you to participate. Talented young leaders will help 
us work to address some of the barriers that still exist, and to make our society 
more accessible for and inclusive of people with disabilities."
– Stéphane Lauzon, Parliamentary Secretary for Sport and Persons with Disabilities
"In 2017, Canada's universities made a public commitment to seven principles on 
equity, diversity and inclusion. And we know that some of the best ideas about 
achieving these principles—both on campus and in society broadly—will come from 
Canada's young people. So we welcome the IDeA student competition as a means 
of bringing forward some of these great new ideas to make the places where we
live, work and play more accessible to people with disabilities."
– Paul Davidson, Universities Canada President

Quick Facts

• The Social Development Partnerships Program helps improve the lives of children 
and families, people with disabilities and other vulnerable Canadians. The Program 
has two funding components: Disability; and Children and Families.
• Since the creation of the Disability component of the Social Development 
Partnerships Program in 1998, the Government of Canada has provided $11 million 
annually in grant and contribution funding to organizations to support projects 
intended to improve the participation and integration of people with disabilities in 
all aspects of Canadian society with respect to social inclusion.
• In 2012, about 14 percent of the Canadian population aged 15 years or 
older—1 in 7 Canadians—reported having a disability that limited their daily 
activities. That number is expected to grow with an aging population.
Associated Links
Program to support the social inclusion of Canadians with disabilities
Innovative designs for accessibility competition
Follow us on Twitter
 
SOURCE Employment and Social Development Canada
For further information:
Media enquiries: Annabelle Archambault, Press Secretary, Office of the Minister of 
Sport and Persons with Disabilities, 
819-934-1122 / TTY: 1-866-702-6967, 
annabelle.archambault@canada.ca; 

Media Relations Office, Employment and Social Development Canada, 
819-994-5559, media@hrsdc-rhdcc.gc.ca
This information is being distributed to you by CNW Group Ltd. 88 Queens Quay 
West, Suite 3000 Toronto ON M5J 0B8
www.newswire.ca 
2017 CNW Group Ltd, all rights reserved 

More..Posted: Feb 14, 2018
Spouses Being Reunited More Quickly in Canada
Spouses being reunited more quickly in Canada 

Sponsorship process improvements have led to backlog reduction
and shorter processing times
 
February 14, 2018 – Mississauga, ON – Over the past year, the Government of 
Canada has made significant improvements to the spousal sponsorship process, 
making it faster and easier for Canadians and permanent residents to reunite with 
their spouses.
 
In December 2016, Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) 
announced that it would reduce the backlog of spousal applicants by 80% 
and shorten processing times to 12 months. It also announced improvements to 
the spousal sponsorship application process to make it more efficient and easier to 
navigate.
 
Today, the Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship, announced that the government has successfully met these 
commitments:
 
· More than 80% of those who were in the global spousal sponsorship backlog on 
December 7, 2016, have now received final decisions for their applications. 
We reduced the spousal inventory from 75,000 applications to 15,000 as of 
December 31, 2017.
· As of December 31, 2017, we met our commitment to process 80% of spousal 
applications that were received in December 2016.
 
In addition, after introducing a new spousal sponsorship application package in 
December 2016, IRCC continued to respond to client and stakeholder feedback to 
further improve the application process, and make it simpler and easier for sponsors 
and applicants to understand and navigate. As a result, we made a number of 
improvements to the application package in June 2017. And today, we introduced 
further updates to the application kit and process to improve the client experience 
and make sure we can process applications as quickly as possible.
 
Quote
 
“The Government of Canada is committed to family reunification. We understand
 how important it is to reunite couples. It also makes for a stronger Canada. 
Canadians who marry someone from abroad shouldn’t have to wait for years to 
have them immigrate or be left with uncertainty in terms of their ability to stay.”
 
– The Honourable Ahmed Hussen, Minister of Immigration, Refugees 
and Citizenship
 
Quick fact
 
· To bring families together, IRCC plans to welcome 66,000 spouses 
and dependants in 2018, well above the average over the past decade of 
about 47,000.
 
Associated link
 
·  Web Notice: Updated application kit for spousal sponsorship
https://canada-preview.adobecqms.net/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/
notices/application-kit-spousal-sponsorship.html

· Graphic: Clearing the backlog
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2018/02/
clearing_the_backlog.html

· Graphic: Reuniting families faster
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2018/02/
reuniting_familiesfaster.html
 
Follow us

· facebook.com/CitCanada
https://www.facebook.com/CitCanada

· twitter.com/CitImmCanada
https://twitter.com/citimmcanada

· instagram.com/CitImmCanada
https://www.instagram.com/citimmcanada/ 
 
Contacts for media only
 
Hursh Jaswal
Minister’s Office
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-954-1064
 
Media Relations
Communications Branch
Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada
613-952-1650
IRCC.COMMMediaRelations-RelationsmediasCOMM.IRCC@cic.gc.ca
 
More..Posted: Feb 14, 2018