City Council Today Endorsed the Most Aambitious Parks and Recreation Facility Development Program Implementation Strategy in Toronto's Hstory
October 29, 2019

Ambitious strategy for Toronto parks and recreation facilities endorsed by 
City Council

City Council today endorsed the most ambitious parks and recreation facility 
development program implementation strategy in Toronto's history, representing 
a $2.223 billion investment in recreation facilities across the city over 
the next 20 years.

The Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038 (FMP) reinforces 
the City's commitment to providing high quality parks and recreation facilities for 
all residents. The plan is informed by Toronto’s growing and changing population, 
and by the ongoing high demand for parks and recreation programs and services. 
Toronto City Council approved the FMP in 2017 and directed staff to report back 
on a detailed implementation strategy.

The strategy provides an evidence-based investment roadmap for when, 
how and where to enhance and revitalize the City's current assets and where to 
build new and improved facilities. The strategy is a living document that can 
respond to opportunities and reflect changing local conditions such 
as unanticipated growth or land becoming available.

Increasing demand for parks and recreation services across the city is fueled by 
Toronto’s unprecedented and concentrated population growth. The FMP 
implementation strategy gives the City the tools to prioritize and build the right 
facilities, in the right places at the right time. If current funding levels are 
maintained, it's estimated that there is sufficient funding based on the 2019-2028 
Capital Budget and Plan for new and enhanced facilities.

Public engagement played an essential role in developing this plan 
and implementation strategy. Almost 6,000 individuals, groups and organizations 
participated in the process. 

This plan responds to the high demand and changing demographics by 
recommending 45 new soccer/multi-use fields, 30 basketball courts 
and five cricket pitches. It also recommends adding new, state-of-the-art 
multi-pad arenas to replace existing older, single-pad arena facilities. 
This plan is committed to increasing the City's ice pad supply by making 
the most of existing facilities and ensuring there is no net loss to Toronto's ice 
pads. The plan invests in existing infrastructure by revitalizing community 
recreation centres and upgrading sport fields, rinks, pools and courts. 

This strategy addresses long-standing service gaps by improving equity in 
recreation service in underserved communities, with nearly 90 per cent of 
recommended revitalizations and 75 per cent of planned new centres serving 
Neighbourhood Improvement Areas.
Staff will report back to Council on implementation progress every five years.
 More information about the master plan is available 
at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.EX9.5
Quote:

"This is the most ambitious recreation facility development program in the City's 
history, representing a $2.223 billion investment in parks and recreation facilities 
to serve our growing and changing population over the next 20 years. 
We're taking action to ensure Toronto's current and future residents have access 
to recreation services they need and want."
- Mayor John Tory 

Media contact: Shane Gerard, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-5711, 
Shane.Gerard@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019
A Request for Proposals (RFP)
October 31, 2019
  
Tenants First plan moves forward with release of RFP to start transfer of Toronto 
Community Housing Corporation's scattered houses 

A Request for Proposals (RFP) will be issued today to initiate the transfer of 
Toronto Community Housing Corporation's (TCHC) scattered portfolio of houses 
(single unit or multiple apartments within a house, scattered across the city) to 
non-profit housing providers, co-ops and community land trusts that are qualified 
to engage with tenants, improve the condition of the properties and retain 
the properties as affordable housing in perpetuity. The RFP covers 
623 TCHC-owned houses, representing 730 units. Tenants living in the scattered 
housing portfolio will not lose their housing or their subsidy.

Toronto City Council in 2017 approved the Tenants First: Phase 1 Implementation 
Plan to restructure the operation, governance and funding of TCHC. Since then, 
the City and TCHC have been building a new relationship with the aim of 
improving services for tenants and protecting the value of the $10-billion social 
housing asset. 

On January 31, 2018, City Council adopted Implementing Tenants First – TCHC 
Scattered Portfolio Plan and an interim selection process for tenant directors on 
the TCHC Board, which continues the Council-approved plan and includes 
the transfer of an identified group of TCHC properties. In addition to this RFP for 
the scattered portfolio, a process is already underway to transfer ownership 
and operation of TCHC's agency houses and rooming houses to qualified 
non-profit housing operators. 

The capital backlog associated with the scattered portfolio properties, 
as of the end of 2016, was $33.9 million. TCHC spends approximately $6 million 
annually in building repair capital on this portfolio. By removing these scattered 
houses from TCHC's portfolio, there will be a reduction in the overall capital repair 
backlog and future capital requirements, as those costs will be transferred with 
the properties to the new housing providers. 

As part of the terms of the transfer, the City will continue to fund the new housing 
providers to deliver social housing. The funding cost and financial impact to 
the City will be dependent on the operating agreements negotiated as part of 
the RFP process which will be considered by Toronto City Council in 2020 
as part of a comprehensive transfer plan. 

The RFP will be issued to non-profit housing organizations, including housing 
co-operatives and community land trusts. Proponents will need to present a viable 
business case and demonstrate a willingness to work within a changing social 
housing sector, build capacity over time and work closely with other organizations. 
Accountability tools are outlined in the RFP and City staff will conduct a detailed 
financial and risk assessment of the transfer of this portfolio, including assessment 
of individual properties. The proponents' plans must ensure that adequate capital 
and operating funds are available from federal, provincial, City or private sources 
to provide for a state of good repair and ongoing, long-term financial viability. 
The City will continue to have a strong oversight role in the operations of 
the social housing assets through operating agreements with the housing 
providers.

A joint review panel made up of TCHC and City staff will make 
the recommendations about successful transferee agencies. Council will consider 
the recommendations in 2020 as part of the comprehensive proposed transfer 
plan, before approving the award of the RFP. If approved, it is expected that 
the houses will be transferred starting in 2020 through to 2022.

The RFP closes at noon on January 29, 2020. More information about the RFP 
and process can be found at https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/
community-partners/affordable-housing-partners/open-requests-for-proposals/. 

Quotes:

"The RFP is the next step in the process of modernizing our housing portfolio to 
achieve better quality of life for tenants and establish a more sustainable funding 
model. The transfer of a public asset of this magnitude to the non-profit sector is 
significant, however this process is grounded in best practices, thorough planning 
and a strong accountability framework."
- Mayor John Tory 

"The beginning of the transfer process is an important milestone. The transfer of 
the scattered housing portfolio will free up resources for TCHC to focus on its core 
portfolio, while improving the condition of these properties and retaining them 
as affordable housing."
- Deputy Mayor Ana Bailão (Ward 9 Davenport), Chair of the Planning 
and Housing Committee 

Media contact: Ellen Leesti, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-1403, 
Ellen.Leesti@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019
Council Highlights
Council Highlights
Toronto City Council meeting of October 29 and 30, 2019                            

Council Highlights is an informal summary of selected actions taken by Toronto 
City Council at its business meetings. The complete, formal documentation for this 
latest meeting is available at http://www.toronto.ca/council.

Transit/transportation

Public transit projects    
After extensive discussion, Council voted in favour of the City negotiating 
agreements with the Ontario government on four public transit projects for 
Toronto. City and TTC staff will work with their provincial counterparts to advance 
plans for the Ontario Line, the Line 2 East Extension, the Yonge Subway Extension 
and the Eglinton West LRT. Council supported numerous motions 
and recommendations as part of this agenda item. Under the City/Ontario 
partnership, the City retains ownership of Toronto's existing subway network 
and the TTC retains its responsibilities for transit network operations. 

Planning for automated vehicles      
Council approved a plan designed to prepare Toronto for the anticipated use of 
automated (driverless) vehicles in the near future. A trial project in Scarborough 
involving an automated shuttle service connecting the West Rouge neighbourhood 
with nearby Rouge Hill GO Transit station is scheduled to start in late 2020. 
Toronto's comprehensive plan for automated vehicles is said to be the first of its 
kind by a North American city.

Road safety measures    
Recommendations involving speed limits and other measures to enhance 
pedestrian safety were approved by Council. Steps to be taken include asking 
the Ontario Ministry of Transportation to consult with the City before considering 
increasing the speed limits on the portions of the 400 series highways that are in 
Toronto. A separate motion that was supported will result in a pilot project using 
new technology available to assist pedestrians in safely crossing streets at busy 
intersections. 

City assets/facilities

Managing the City's real estate assets      
Council adopted a report called ModernTO that sets out a strategy for the City's 
real estate portfolio. The strategy aims to optimize City real estate assets in ways 
that modernize municipal office space and create efficiencies. A related agenda 
item that Council adopted calls on CreateTO, the Toronto Community Housing 
Corporation, the Toronto Parking Authority and the Toronto Transit Commission, 
to adopt similar policies for their office portfolios. 

Investment in parks and recreation facilities   
Council endorsed a strategy for providing parks and recreation facilities across 
the city over the next 20 years. The strategy, which is based on a commitment to 
high-quality parks and recreation facilities serving all Toronto residents, provides 
details for implementing an earlier adopted Parks and Recreation Facilities Master 
Plan. Implementing the plan entails investing in community recreation centres, 
aquatic and ice facilities, sports fields and courts, splash pads and other facilities.

Use of community spaces in City facilities     
Council supported a motion calling on City officials to consult with 
LGBTQ2S+ stakeholders and to review the City's policies governing third party 
use of community spaces in City facilities. Staff are to report to Council early in 
the new year. A focus involves ensuring that the identification of groups 
contravening the City’s human rights and anti-harassment/discrimination policy, 
and the denial or revoking of permits to such groups, are done in a timely manner. 
Part of the motion addresses the Toronto Public Library Board and its policies on 
the use of community spaces.

Cyber security   
Council adopted recommendations intended to strengthen security controls in 
information technology at the City and at City of Toronto agencies 
nd corporations. The related audit report notes that cyberattacks – unauthorized 
attempts to gain access to a system and confidential data, modify it in some way 
or delete or render information in the system unusable – are one of the biggest 
threats facing organizations today.

Process for selecting shelter locations     
A motion concerning shelters, respites and drop-in programs in the east 
downtown area received Council's approval. Staff are to provide recommendations 
to improve public engagement and consultation around locating new shelters, 
respites and drop-in programs in that area. 

Waterfront and island flooding    
Council considered a report on flooding experienced along the waterfront 
and at Toronto Island Park in 2017 and 2019, and on funding for rehabilitation 
and repair work to waterfront parks damaged by flooding. Related motions that 
Council adopted address matters such as financial assistance that the City provides 
for flooded properties.

Environment and health   

Progress on a low-carbon fleet   
Council adopted a new "green fleet" plan with the goal of moving toward 
a sustainable, climate-resilient, low-carbon City vehicle fleet. Related objectives 
include making 45 per cent of the City-owned fleet low-carbon vehicles by 2030. 
This plan will build on the momentum of the green fleet plan 
that covered 2014 to 2018 and established the City of Toronto as 
a Canadian leader in testing and adopting green vehicle technologies and efficient 
fleet-management practices.

Mental health and addictions   
Council adopted a motion that urges the federal government to invest $900,000 
a year to help address Toronto's mental health and addiction crises. The motion 
calls on the government to commit to funding parity by investing one dollar on 
mental health for every dollar spent on physical health. According to the motion, 
this urgently needed federal investment in Toronto should go toward mental 
health services and new supportive housing.

Sale of vaping products    
Council supported amending the Toronto Municipal Code to introduce a new 
licence requirement for vapour ("vaping") product retailers effective April 1, 2020. 
The fee structure is the same as for tobacco retailers. The report before Council 
documented about 80 specialty retailers of vapour products operating in Toronto 
and many non-specialty retailers such as convenience stores that carry 
e-cigarette/vaping products. The report also elaborates on related health 
concerns.  

Community support

Child-care in schools    
Council authorized proceeding with the joint approval process for 49 school-based 
child-care capital projects in co-operation with school boards, as well as up to 20 
additional school-based capital projects, subject to provincial funding approval. 
Council voted to call on the province to reverse its funding formula changes to 
child care in Ontario and maintain previous levels of funding, and to implement 
multi-year budgets for child care. 

Police presence in Lawrence Heights    
A motion calling on Council to ask the Toronto police to establish a community 
police office in the Lawrence Heights neighbourhood received Council's approval. 
The motion noted that the main police headquarters serving that part of the city is 
8.4 kilometres away from Lawrence Heights, and said there is a need for a police 
office within the community, given the problems of persistent gun violence 
and other criminal activity in the area.

Culture

Priorities for cultural investment    
A report identifying three strategic priorities to guide the City's cultural 
investments over the next five years received Council's approval. The three 
priorities involve increasing opportunities for all Torontonians to participate in local 
cultural activities that reflect the city's diversity and creativity, maintaining 
and creating new spaces for the creative sector, and strengthening and increasing 
the diversity of the cultural workforce.

Changes to cultural grants   
Council approved a proposal to realign the City's cultural grants program, 
with the intention of providing more equitable access to funding. 
Two long-established funding programs (Major Cultural Organizations and Grants 
to Specialized Collections Museums) will be dismantled as the City introduces two 
new funding programs in 2020 – called Cultural Festivals and Cultural Access 
and Development.

Miscellaneous 

Appointment of Integrity Commissioner    
Council appointed Jonathan Batty as the City's new Integrity Commissioner, 
effective November 30. The Integrity Commissioner provides advice, complaint 
resolution and education to members of City Council and local boards 
on the application of the City’s codes of conduct, the Municipal Conflict of Interest 
Act and other bylaws, policies and legislation governing ethical behaviour. 
Valerie Jepson, the previous Integrity Commissioner, completed her five-year 
appointment this year. 

Rules for temporary signs   
Changes to the City's rules for A-frame and portable signs were approved by 
Council. A key consideration for the changes is improving the pedestrian clearway 
on sidewalks. The report's recommendations also address the City's expectations 
for signs at construction sites, specifically on minimizing the impacts of residential 
construction activity on neighbourhoods.

Enhancement of University Avenue     
Council supported a proposal for implementing the first phase of an initiative that 
involves illuminating and animating University Avenue with art installations. 
A group called the Friends of University Avenue plans for a temporary, illuminated 
art installation to be located at the intersection of University Avenue and Gerrard 
Street as the first project. University Avenue, known as the most ceremonial street 
in downtown Toronto, links the Ontario Legislature at Queen's Park to Union 
Station at Front Street.  

___________________________________________________________________

Volume 22   Issue 8
Council Highlights, a summary of selected decisions made by Toronto City Council, 
is produced by Strategic Communications. 
Formal documentation of City Council decisions: http://www.toronto.ca/council  
Questions about Council meetings and decisions: clerk@toronto.ca 
or 416-392-8016 
Information about distribution of this summary: stratcom@toronto.ca 
Previous editions: https://www.toronto.ca/home/media-room/council-highlights/

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019
City of Toronto to Hold Property Sale to Recover Unpaid Taxes
November 1, 2019
  
City of Toronto to hold property sale to recover unpaid taxes

The City of Toronto is holding a Sale of Land by Public Tender, known as 
a property tax sale, as a final step in the collection of overdue, unpaid property 
taxes. Six properties with a combined total of more than $2.2 million in unpaid 
property taxes are up for sale. The bidding period to purchase these properties is 
until November 28. 

Once a property has accumulated property tax arrears of two years or more, 
a Tax Arrears Certificate is registered against the title of the property, allowing 
the property to be put up for sale unless it is paid off. Typically, the properties 
that are chosen for sale have more than three years of arrears and are residential 
homes or land that is not occupied, where owners may be deceased or relocated, 
and next of kin cannot be found. 

The six properties to be sold are: 
• three unoccupied residential properties (46 Carling Ave., 58 Laws St., 
and 56 Netherly Dr.)
• one vacant commercial land property (1339 Danforth Rd.) 
• two occupied commercial properties (97 and 127 Rivalda Rd.)

The City makes every reasonable attempt to contact the property owner by mail, 
phone, site visits and speaking with neighbours to locate and inform the property 
owner before listing a property for sale.

The properties can be purchased by anyone, with the highest offer accepted by 
the City. Full payment must be made to the City within 14 days, and a tax deed for 
the property is prepared. The City keeps the money owed in back taxes 
and any other charges against the land or costs incurred related to the tax sale, 
and the balance is paid to the Ontario Court.

Tenders must be submitted in the prescribed form and be accompanied by 
a deposit of at least 20 per cent of the tender amount. For more information 
or to obtain a copy of the tender form, contact Nick Naddeo, Manager, 
Revenue Accounting and Collections, at 416-395-0014.


Media contact: Ashley Hammill, Strategic Communications, 
416-392-6786, 
Ashley.Hammill@toronto.ca 

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019
Time Change Means Drivers Must Slow Down and be Alert for Pedestrians and Cyclists
Friday, November 1                        
  
Time change means drivers must slow down and be alert for pedestrians 
and cyclists

The City of Toronto is urging all road users – drivers, cyclists, transit riders 
and pedestrians – to stay alert as daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. on Sunday, 
November 3. 

The return to standard time means fewer daylight hours and reduced visibility for 
all road users in the city. In Toronto, pedestrian collisions increase by more 
than 30 per cent during the evening commute hours from November to March. 

To draw attention to the increased risks facing pedestrians and cyclists, 
the City of Toronto is launching a city-wide public education campaign 
that promotes road safety as we enter a season with reduced daylight hours. 
It features a series of painted faces with the eyes focused on either a pedestrian, 
a cyclist or a vehicle. Using the slogan "Take another look," the campaign intends 
to remind Torontonians, especially drivers, to be aware of each other as they 
share the city's roads.

The campaign will appear on bus backs, transit shelters and elevator screens, 
in addition to radio, print and social media ads. 

Similar advertising efforts around the daylight saving time change in New York City 
led to an overall reduction in fatalities.

On Monday, the Toronto Police Service will also begin a one-week safety blitz 
across the city to encourage residents to drive alert and stay safe. The Police will 
focus their enforcement resources on the most dangerous violations – speeding 
and impaired, aggressive and distracted driving – and increase their on-street 
presence.  

When visibility is reduced, people and objects on the road are harder to see. 
The City of Toronto is asking drivers to follow the following safety tips after 
daylight saving time ends this Sunday:
• When driving, please slow down, turn slowly and stay alert at all times.
• Make sure vehicle headlights and signal lights are functioning properly.
• Obey speed limits and approach all crosswalks, intersections and transit stops 
with caution.
• Give yourself plenty of time wherever you're going and plan your route in 
advance. Use public transit when possible.

City staff are also reducing speed limits on approximately 250 kilometres of roads 
in the city in an effort to curb speeding and minimize traffic-related fatalities 
on Toronto's roads. Close to 50 roadways will see their limits dropped by 10 km/h 
by year's end.

More information about the "Take another look" campaign is available 
at https://www.toronto.ca/services-payments/streets-parking-transportation/
road-safety/vision-zero/educational-campaigns/stay-alertstay-safe-campaign/.

More information about the speed limit reductions campaign is available 
at https://www.toronto.ca/services-payments/streets-parking-transportation/
road-safety/vision-zero/safety-initiatives/initiatives/speed-limit-reductions/.

The Vision Zero Road Safety Plan is a comprehensive action plan that aims to 
reduce traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries on Toronto’s streets. 
With more than 50 safety measures across six emphasis areas, the plan prioritizes 
the safety of Toronto's most vulnerable road users: pedestrians, schoolchildren, 
seniors and cyclists. More information is available 
at https://www.toronto.ca/VisionZero. 

Quotes:

"I'm urging all people in the city, especially drivers, to slow down 
and pay increased attention on the road. It is imperative that we raise awareness 
about the dangers associated with reduced visibility at this time of year, 
and this is what we hope the 'Take another look' campaign will achieve. 
This week, I have also met with Transportation Services to identify ways we can 
accelerate our efforts to install new road safety measures, including crosswalks 
and signals, and speed up the City's road redesign work to make our streets 
safer."
- Mayor John Tory

"We have seen an increase in the past in traffic collisions after the clocks turned 
back, especially for our most vulnerable road users – pedestrians and cyclists. 
It's time we stop this. It is vital that everyone who uses our roads be aware of 
their surroundings, stay alert and drive safe. Vision Zero is everyone's 
responsibility."
- Councillor James Pasternak (Ward 6 York Centre), Chair of the Infrastructure 
and Environment Committee


Media contact: Hakeem Muhammad, Strategic Communications, 
416-338-5536, 
Hakeem.Muhammad@toronto.ca
More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019