City of Toronto Installing Automated Speed Enforcement Cameras
December 16, 2019
  
City of Toronto installing Automated Speed Enforcement cameras

Starting today the City of Toronto will begin installing Automated Speed 
Enforcement (ASE) cameras and signage on Toronto streets in an effort to increase
road safety, reduce speeding and raise public awareness about the need to slow 
down and obey posted speed limits. 

Automated Speed Enforcement is an efficient tool in the City's Vision Zero toolbox 
that will see an initial total of 50 cameras installed on local, collector and arterial 
roads in Community Safety Zones near schools. Each ward will have two 
ASE cameras that will capture and record images of vehicles travelling in excess of 
the posted speed limit. 

Speed is a contributing factor in approximately one third of fatal collisions in 
Canada. More than 50 percent of convictions related to the Highway Traffic 
Act in Ontario were from speeding offences. In Toronto, ASE is intended to 
work in tandem with other Vision Zero methods and strategies already in place, 
including road redesign improvements, police enforcement and public education.

To warn drivers and raise awareness about ASE in advance of laying any charges, 
the City is also launching a 90-day public education campaign starting this week 
that will include issuing warning letters to speeding drivers in lieu of tickets 
(no response will be required). Warning signage will be installed in each ward to 
inform drivers as they approach an ASE camera.

ASE tickets are expected to start being issued to speeding drivers in the spring of 
2020 at the end of the 90-day public education campaign. If a vehicle exceeds 
the posted speed limit in an ASE-enforced area, a ticket will be mailed to 
the registered plate holder. Offenders are only fined – no demerit points will be 
applied.

ASE camera locations were selected based on data that indicated where speed 
and collision challenges exist in Community Safety Zones near schools in Toronto. 
Additional selection criteria included planned road work, speed limits, obstructions 
or impediments to equipment, boulevard space and the nature of the road.

The locations are:
• Ward 1: Royalcrest Road between Cabernet Circle and Leading Road
• Ward 1: Harefield Drive between Barford Road and Elmhurst Drive
• Ward 2: Renforth Drive between Tabard Gate and Lafferty Street
• Ward 2: Trehorne Drive between Duffield Road and Tallon Road
• Ward 3: Horner Avenue between Orianna Drive and Foch Avenue
• Ward 3: Chartwell Road between Badger Avenue and Larstone Avenue
• Ward 4: Jameson Avenue between Laxton Avenue and Leopold Street
• Ward 4: Close Avenue between Queen Street and King Street
• Ward 5: Bicknell Avenue between Juliet Crescent and Avon Drive
• Ward 5: Brookhaven Drive between Fox Point and Nordale Crescent
• Ward 6: Faywood Boulevard between Faith Avenue and Sunbeam Avenue
• Ward 6: Wilmington Avenue between Finch Avenue and Purdon Drive
• Ward 7: Derrydown Road between Killamarsh Drive and Catford Road
• Ward 7: Grandravine Drive between Jane Street and Driftwood Avenue
• Ward 8: Corona Street between Wenderly Drive and Claver Avenue
• Ward 8: Ridge Hill Drive between Old Park Road and Glenarden Road
• Ward 9: Caledonia Road between Rogers Road and Corby Avenue
• Ward 9: Gladstone Avenue between Cross Street and Waterloo Avenue
• Ward 10: Manning Avenue between Dundas Street West and Robinson Street
• Ward 10: Givins Street between Argyle Street and Bruce Street
• Ward 11: Lippincott Street between Vankoughnet Street and College Street
• Ward 11: Huron Street between Bernard Avenue and Lowther Avenue
• Ward 12: Atlas Avenue between Ava Road and Belvidere Avenue
• Ward 12: Brownlow Avenue between Eglinton Avenue and Soudan Avenue
• Ward 13: Prospect Street between Rose Avenue and Ontario Street
• Ward 13: Spruce Street between Gifford Street and Nasmith Avenue
• Ward 14: Chatham Avenue between Jones Avenue and Euston Avenue
• Ward 14: Morse Street between Queen Street and Eastern Avenue
• Ward 15: Bessborough Drive between Field Avenue and Sharron Drive
• Ward 15: Ranleigh Avenue between Yonge Street and Mount Pleasant Road
• Ward 16: Gateway Boulevard between Don Mills Road (south intersection)
 Grenoble Drive
• Ward 16: Ness Drive between York Mills Road and Lynedock Crescent
• Ward 17: Elkhorn Drive between Whittaker Crescent and Hawksbury Drive
• Ward 17: Cherokee Boulevard between Pawnee Avenue and Shawnee Circle
• Ward 18: Patricia Avenue between Laconia Drive and Homewood Avenue
• Ward 18: Lillian Street between Abitibi Avenue and Otonabee Avenue
• Ward 19: Gower Street between Cedarcrest Boulevard and Dawes Road
• Ward 19: Barrington Avenue between Balfour Avenue and Doncaster Avenue
• Ward 20: Falmouth Avenue between Brussels Road and Ordway Road
• Ward 20: Birchmount Road between Kingston Road and Hollis Avenue
• Ward 21: Brimorton Drive between Hathway Drive and Neapolitan Drive
• Ward 21: Marcos Boulevard between Cicerella Crescent (east intersection) 
and Cicerella Crescent (west intersection)
• Ward 22: Beverly Glen Boulevard between Stonebridge Boulevard 
and Silver Spruce Drive
• Ward 22: Silver Springs Boulevard between Revlis Crescent (east intersection) 
and Revlis Crescent (west intersection)
• Ward 23: Crow Trail between Crittenden Square and Bradstone Square
• Ward 23: Alton Towers Circle between Goldhawk Trail (north intersection) 
and Goldhawk Trail (south intersection)
• Ward 24: Galloway Road between Lawrence Avenue and Weir Crescent
• Ward 24: Military Trail between Cindy Nicholas Drive and Bonspiel Drive
• Ward 25: Hupfield Trail between Glanvil Crescent (north intersection) 
and Glanvil Crescent (south intersection) 
• Ward 25: Murison Boulevard between Breckon Gate and Curtis Crescent

More information about the City's Automated Speed Enforcement program is 
available at http://www.toronto.ca/ASE.   

The Vision Zero Road Safety Plan is a comprehensive action plan that aims 
to reduce traffic-related fatalities and serious injuries on Toronto’s streets. 
With over 50 safety measures across six emphasis areas, the plan prioritizes 
the safety of our most vulnerable road users: pedestrians, schoolchildren, 
seniors and cyclists. More information is available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/VisionZero. 

Quotes:

"Speed limits are not suggestions – they are the law. Automated Speed 
Enforcement is a reminder for drivers in Toronto to slow down and obey 
the posted speed limit. We have fought for years for the provincial regulations to 
allow Automated Speed Enforcement on our streets because we know it will save 
lives. I'm confident this program will not only enhance safety in our Community 
Safety Zones but will also bring us closer to our Vision Zero goals."
- Mayor John Tory 

"Those exceeding the speed limit and putting lives at risk will almost certainly 
receive a ticket. And they should.  Those obeying the rules of the road, staying 
within the speed limit and respecting vulnerable pedestrians and road users have
little to worry about and set a good example for everyone." 
- Councillor James Pasternak (Ward 6 York Centre), Chair of the Infrastructure 
and Environment Committee

Media contact: Hakeem Muhammad, Strategic Communications, 
416-338-5536, 
Hakeem.Muhammad@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Dec 20, 2019
St. Lawrence Market Welcomes Mayor John Tory to Holiday Shopping Day
St. Lawrence Market welcomes Mayor John Tory to Holiday Shopping Day

Tomorrow, Mayor John Tory will join Toronto residents and visitors 
at the St. Lawrence Market for a holiday shopping day promoting its extended 
holiday hours and special activities.

Date:  Saturday, December 21
Time:  10:30 a.m.
Location: St. Lawrence Market, South (main) Building at 91-95 Front St. E.

Media are invited to join Mayor Tory to capture footage of the shopping day, 
announcements about extended holiday hours and background footage of holiday 
shopping at St. Lawrence Market.


Media contact: Samantha Wiles, St. Lawrence Market Complex, 
647-884-6567, 
Samantha.Wiles@toronto.ca 
More..Posted: Dec 20, 2019
A new 10-year HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan
December 17, 2019

City Council approves HousingTO action plan addressing Toronto's housing needs 
over the next 10 years 

Toronto City Council today approved the City of Toronto’s new 10-year 
HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan. 

The action plan addresses the full spectrum of housing from homelessness 
and social housing to affordable rental housing and long-term care. The action 
plan will assist more than 341,000 Toronto households and includes:
• approving 40,000 new affordable rental homes, including 18,000 new supportive 
homes approvals for vulnerable residents, some of whom are homeless or at risk 
of being homeless, and a minimum of 25 per cent (10,000) new affordable rental 
and supportive homes dedicated to women and girls, including female-led 
households
• preventing 10,000 evictions for low-income households 
• improving housing affordability for 40,000 households, and
• assisting more than 10,000 seniors remain in their homes or move to long-term 
care facilities.

Implementation of the full 10-year plan is estimated to cost $23.4 billion and calls 
for new investments from all three orders of government. Through current 
and future investments, the City will fund $8.5 billion, with $5.5 billion already 
committed through operating, capital investments and other financial tools. 
The action plan calls on the federal and provincial governments to invest 
a combined $14.9 billion.

The action plan contains 76 actions to address the needs of people across 
the housing spectrum. Highlights of the actions include:
• Adopt a revised "Toronto Housing Charter: Opportunity for All" document. 
• Enhance measures to prevent evictions and people becoming homeless.
• Preserve the rental homes that currently exist. 
• Adopt a new program definition of affordable rental housing based on income.
• Create a multi-sector land bank to support the approval of 40,000 new rental 
and supportive homes.
• Engage the federal and provincial governments to implement the new Canada 
Housing Benefit and support the creation of supportive and affordable rental 
homes. 

As part of today's vote on the action plan, City Council also sent a clear message
to federal and provincial governments that homelessness in Toronto is an ongoing 
critical and emergency issue requiring those two governments to commit 
on an expedited basis to build on the initiatives the City has taken to date.

Quotes:

"We know it is critical for the future of our rapidly growing city that people from 
all income levels have a place to call home. The HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan 
provides a critically important path forward – it will ensure the City is taking action 
to get more affordable housing built and leading the charge to make sure 
all governments are focused on housing as a right for people. The City’s 
commitment is $8.5 billion towards this $23.4 billion plan. I will be working hard 
with the other orders of government to ensure the entire plan is fully funded. 
In particular, the HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan calls on the federal 
government to enhance and extend efforts under the National Housing Strategy 
and calls on the provincial government to commit to increasing income supports 
and supportive housing options to vulnerable people. This has to be 
a priority – we have to come together to support households who are struggling to 
pay the rent and keep, or put, a roof over their heads. I look forward to building 
on this strong foundation of working together."
- Mayor John Tory 

"The HousingTO 2020-2030 Action Plan is a people-centred plan that identifies real 
actions to effectively address the very real challenges we are facing.  It recognises 
that Toronto is place where families and individuals deserve to live in safe, 
well-maintained and affordable housing – and demonstrates that providing this 
will create opportunities to succeed. Housing everyone is good for everyone 
and the HousingTO Plan will bring positive change and real outcomes for Toronto 
residents."
- Deputy Mayor Ana Bailão (Ward 9 Davenport), Chair of the Planning 
and Housing Committee


Media contact: Ellen Leesti, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-1403, 
Ellen.Leesti@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
City Council Approves 2020 Rate-Supported Budgets
December 17, 2019
  
City Council approves 2020 rate-supported budgets

Toronto City Council has approved the 2020 rate-supported operating and capital 
budgets for Toronto Water, Toronto Parking Authority and Solid Waste 
Management Services. The approved budgets maintain and improve current 
service levels and make significant investments for the City’s future.

Toronto Water's 2020 rate-supported budget consists of an operating budget of 
$1.4 billion including a capital reserve contribution of $921.2 million, a capital 
budget of $1.2 billion and a 10-year capital plan of $14.5 billion. A three per cent 
rate increase will be effective January 1, 2020 – the average household will see 
an annual increase of approximately $27 next year. The budget focuses 
on continuing to deliver clean, safe drinking water, treat wastewater and manage 
stormwater, in an environmentally and fiscally responsible way for the city's 
residents, businesses and visitors while dealing with the impacts of extreme 
storms, aging infrastructure and significant city growth.

Toronto Parking Authority’s budget aims to meet the parking needs of businesses, 
communities and visitors in Toronto. The approved 2020 budget includes 
an operating budget that generates net revenue of $70.1 million for on-street 
parking, off-street parking and the Bike Share program, a capital budget of 
$66 million and a 10-year capital plan of $355.2 million.

The Solid Waste Management Services 2020 budget funds waste collection for 
almost 900,000 residential homes and organizations. It also contributes to 
the beautification of Toronto through city-wide litter pickup and the collection of 
waste from park bins and street bins and cleanup of special events. 
The budget ensures the continued implementation of the Long Term Waste 
Management Strategy, which supports waste reduction, reuse and diversion of 
waste away from landfill. The approved budget includes an operating budget of 
$378.9 million, including a capital reserve contribution of $18.8 million, 
a capital budget of $81.3 million and a 10-Year Capital Plan of $768.1 million. 
Priorities over the next 10 years include renewable natural gas infrastructure 
that will allow the City to harness the green energy potential of landfill gas 
and biogas, the acceleration of a third organics processing facility and planning to 
ensure sufficient capacity for long-term disposal of garbage. A 2.45 per cent 
blended rate increase will be effective January 1, 2020. The Solid Waste rebates 
will be determined as part of the tax-supported budget process, which will launch 
on January 10, 2020.

Budget notes, presentations and reports are available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/budget/.

Quotes:

"Today, City Council approved water and solid waste rate budgets that are focused 
on maintaining and improving service levels for Toronto’s residents, while ensuring 
financial sustainability. The capital budgets invests in key priority areas while 
supporting our growing population’s emerging needs. The Toronto Water 
2020 budget alone invests $616 million in in water infrastructure state of good 
repair – that's a major investment in Toronto Water's state of good repair backlog. 
This budget makes sure we're digging up water pipes that are more than 
100 years old and replacing them rather than waiting until they break and having 
to do costly emergency fixes.”
– Mayor John Tory

"People expect their garbage, recycling, green bin, and yard waste will get picked 
up when they put it out on the curb and they expect clean water will come out of 
the tap when they turn it on - that's what we make sure these budgets will 
provide. The investments these budgets make will ensure we are continuing 
important work across the city like the work we saw this summer on our water 
and stormwater infrastructure as part of our $1 billion construction season."
- Budget Chief Gary Crawford (Ward 20 Scarborough Southwest)

Media contacts:
Toronto Water: Diane Morrison, Strategic Communications, 
416-392-3496, 
Diane.Morrison@toronto.ca

Solid Waste Management Services: Tamara Staranchuk, Strategic Communications, 
416-392-4716, 
Tamara.Staranchuk@toronto.ca

Toronto Parking Authority: Robin Oliphant, Toronto Parking Authority, 
416-393-7282, 
Robin.Oliphant@toronto.ca 

More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
Extreme Cold Weather Alert
December 18, 2019
                                    
Extreme Cold Weather Alert – seek shelter, check on loved ones

Based on Environment and Climate Change Canada's forecast, Dr. Eileen de Villa, 
Toronto's Medical Officer of Health, has issued an Extreme Cold Weather Alert 
today for Toronto in anticipation of colder weather conditions within the next 24 
hours or longer. The Extreme Cold Weather Alert will be in effect until further 
notice. 

Extreme Cold Weather Alerts are issued when the temperature in the daily forecast 
suggests temperatures will reach approximately -15 degrees Celsius or colder, 
or when the wind chill is forecast to reach -20 or colder. The Medical Officer of 
Health may also consider other weather-related factors when issuing Extreme Cold 
Weather Alerts.

Exposure to cold weather can be harmful to your health. Hypothermia occurs 
when the body's core temperature drops below 35 degrees Celsius and can have 
severe consequences, including organ failure and death. Frostbite can also occur in 
cold weather when skin freezes and, in severe cases, can lead to amputation 
when deeper tissues freeze.

Those most at risk of cold-related illness are people experiencing homelessness or 
those under-housed, those who work outdoors, people with a pre-existing heart 
condition or respiratory illness, elderly people, infants and young children. 
People with heart problems can experience worsening of their condition up to 
several days after cold weather occurs. 

Extreme Cold Weather Alerts activate local services that focus on getting 
and keeping vulnerable residents inside. A warming centre is open at Metro 
Hall by 7 p.m. the day an alert is called, and remains open continuously until noon 
on the day an alert is terminated. Other services include notification to community 
agencies to relax any service restrictions, availability of transit tokens in some 
drop-ins, and additional overnight street outreach. 

Throughout the year, 24-hour respite sites provide meals, places to rest, 
and service referrals at locations across the city. People can call 311 for locations 
and to connect to Central Intake for a referral. Homeless Help lists site information 
at http://www.toronto.ca/homelesshelp. 

The City asks that residents help vulnerable people by calling 311 if there is 
a need for street outreach assistance. Call 911 if the situation is an emergency.

During an Extreme Cold Weather Alert, members of the public are encouraged to 
take the following precautions: 
• Check the weather report before going outside.
• Dress in layers, making sure your outer layer is windproof, and cover exposed 
skin.
• Wear a hat, warm mittens or gloves, and warm boots. 
• Stay dry. Your risk of hypothermia is much greater if you are wet.
• Choose wool or synthetic fabrics for your clothes instead of cotton, because 
cotton absorbs and holds moisture, no longer keeping the wearer warm. 
• Seek shelter if you normally spend long periods outside. Depending on the wind 
chill, exposed skin can freeze in minutes. 
• Drink warm fluids other than alcohol. 
• Warm up by taking regular breaks in heated buildings when enjoying winter 
activities outside. 
• Consider rescheduling outdoor activities, or limiting time outdoors, during colder 
temperatures, especially if it's windy. 
• Heat your home to at least 21 degrees Celsius if infants or elderly people 
are present.
• Call or visit vulnerable friends, neighbours and family to ensure they 
are not experiencing any difficulties related to the weather.

More information and tips for staying warm during cold weather are available 
at https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/health-wellness-care/
health-programs-advice/extreme-cold-weather/.

Information to help residents prepare for extreme weather and weatherproof 
their homes is available at https://www.toronto.ca/extremeweatherready.

Media contacts: 
Lisa Liu, Toronto Public Health, 
416-338-1793,
Lisa.Liu@toronto.ca

City of Toronto Media Line, 
416-338-5986, 
media@toronto.ca  

More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
City Council Approves New Approach to Care for Long-Term Care Homes
December 18, 2019
  
City Council approves new approach to care for long-term care homes

City Council today voted unanimously to approve a new emotion-centred approach 
to care to be implemented in the City’s 10 long-term care (LTC) homes.

The made-in-Toronto approach was developed to improve outcomes for residents 
and their families, and service delivery for residents living in City-operated LTC 
homes. Seniors Services and Long-Term Care (SSLTC) will implement 
the comprehensive approach to:
• focus on care relationships and emotional support
• provide consistent caregivers for residents
• redesign the physical space to be less institutional, more home-like 
and comfortable
• address the significant diversity of Toronto’s Seniors
• increase staffing levels to provide more direct care and meet the increasingly 
complex care needs of residents
• promote flexibility, teamwork and sharing of best practices

The strategy to implement this new approach to care includes a 12-month pilot 
project at Lakeshore Lodge to test the new approach before rolling it out to 
all 10 City-run long-term care homes. Independent experts from the University of 
Toronto Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work will review and evaluate 
the pilot to assist the City with broader implementation in the future.

It’s estimated that the pilot will cost $500,000 and implementing the new 
approach in all 10 City-run long-term care homes over six years (including 
the pilot year) will cost approximately $24 million. Funding will be a year-over-year 
discussion as part of the budget process.

This approach is the next step for the City to continue its focus on the growing 
number of seniors in Toronto. In May 2018, Toronto City Council renewed 
the Toronto Seniors Strategy to improve and integrate services for seniors 
including health, housing, transportation, employment and access to services. 
To date, of the 27 recommendations adopted by Council, 17 are fully implemented 
and 10 are in progress. 

The full Seniors Services and Long-Term Care implementation plan and update 
report is available at toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.
EC10.8.

Seniors Services and Long-Term Care are leaders in excellence 
and ground-breaking services for healthy aging with a commitment to 
CARE – Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence.

Quotes:

“It’s important that we have the right programs, services and level of care in place 
that cater to the needs of our diverse population; especially as our senior 
population continues to grow. This new approach to care positions Toronto 
as a leader in the area of long-term care and puts us on a path to become 
a centre of excellence.”
- Mayor John Tory 

“One size does not fit all when it comes to long-term care. By combining 
emotion-centred best practices with strategies tailored to the needs of our 
residents, the City is ensuring its approach to care remains innovative and focused 
on improving the lives of our seniors."
- Councillor Deputy Mayor Michael Thompson, Councillor (Ward 21 Scarborough 
Centre), Chair of the Economic and Community Development Committee

“Council has taken an important step forward to improve the lives of seniors living 
in Toronto’s long-term care homes. Adopting emotion-centred approaches to care, 
such as the Butterfly Model, has been proven to result in healthier and happier 
residents. This pilot project builds on the City’s Seniors Strategy to provide 
innovative and thoughtful delivery of services to support Toronto’s changing 
demographics.”
- Councillor Josh Matlow (Ward 12 Toronto-St. Paul’s), Toronto Seniors Advocate 
and Co-chair of the Toronto Seniors Strategy Accountability Table

Media contact: Natasha Hinds Fitzsimmins, Strategic Communications, 
416-392-5349, 
Natasha.HindsFitzsimmins@toronto.ca
More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
Council Highlights
Council Highlights
Toronto City Council meeting of December 17 and 18, 2019      

Council Highlights is an informal summary of selected actions taken by Toronto 
City Council at its business meetings. The formal documentation for this latest 
meeting is available at http://www.toronto.ca/council.

Funding for city-building efforts
Council approved an extension to the City Building Fund, agreeing to invest 
an additional $6.6 billion to improve Toronto’s transit system and build affordable 
housing. The funds will be raised by an increased levy dedicated to investments 
in major transit and housing initiatives. The City Building Fund was first approved 
by City Council as part of the 2016 budget. This updated levy will cost the average 
Toronto household about $45 a year as part of municipal property tax bills over 
the next six years.

Action plan to address housing needs
Council approved the HousingTO action plan created to address Toronto's housing 
needs over the next 10 years. The plan will assist almost 350,000 Toronto 
households, covering the full range of housing, including support for homeless 
people, social housing, affordable rental housing and long-term care.
Implementation of the full 10-year plan, estimated to cost $23.4 billion, 
relies on new investments from all three orders of government. The City is 
committed to funding $8.5 billion of that total.   

Rate-supported budgets for 2020 
The City's rate-supported budgets for Solid Waste Management Services, 
Toronto Water and the Toronto Parking Authority received Council's approval. 
The operating and capital budgets will maintain and improve current service levels 
and make investments for the future of those three operations.

Innovation in long-term care
Council approved a new approach for providing care to residents of City-operated 
long-term care homes, with the focus on an emotion-centred approach that still 
maintains clinical excellence. The overall intention is to improve outcomes for 
the residents and their families. The strategy to implement this new approach 
includes a 12-month pilot project at Lakeshore Lodge before implementation 
t all 10 City-run long-term care homes. 

Ontario's disability support program
Council supported a member motion to ask the Ontario government to reverse its 
announced cut to social support funding and to urge the government to maintain 
the current definition of disability for Ontario Disability Support Program. Council 
will also ask the province to continue to increase social assistance rates 
and engage with people living with disabilities, taking their lived experience into 
account when designing social assistance programs.

Public art strategy   
Council adopted a public art strategy for the City covering the next 10 years to 
promote new and innovative approaches to the creation of public art, connect 
artists and communities, and display public art in every Toronto neighbourhood. 
The strategy includes 21 actions to advance public art and heighten the impact of 
the City's public art programs for the benefit of residents and visitors. 

LGBTQ2S+ advisory body for City Council  
Council approved the establishment of, and terms of reference for, a Lesbian, 
Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2S+) Council advisory 
body. The advisory body will provide a dedicated mechanism to represent 
LGBTQ2S+ residents' interests and concerns, informing City Council's 
decision-making during the current 2018-2022 term of Council. Since 2010, 
there has been no designated Council body speaking for Toronto's 
LGBTQ2S+ communities.  

Formal remembrance of the Holocaust
A member motion supported by Council will result in the declaration of January 27 
as International Holocaust Remembrance Day in Toronto. The United Nations 
designated that date to honour the victims of the Holocaust. Toronto is home 
to many Holocaust survivors and/or their families. Marking the day in Toronto is 
also an opportunity to create greater public awareness of this terrible period in 
history, when more than six million innocent Jewish men, women and children 
were systematically murdered by the Nazi regime and its collaborators from 1933 
to 1945. 

Relocation of Etobicoke Civic Centre
Council authorized proceeding with phase three of a process to replace 
the outdated Etobicoke Civic Centre with a new complex on a site known 
as the Westwood Theatre Lands. Phase three of this capital project includes 
detailed design and tendering for construction. The project will result in new civic 
and community infrastructure in Etobicoke, including a recreation centre, library, 
childcare facility and public square. 

Bars, restaurants and nightclubs
Council voted to ask the provincial government to review legislation enabling 
the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario to revoke the liquor licences of 
problematic establishments serving alcohol in Toronto, including those with 
a history of repeated criminal activity in connection with the premises. Council's 
action comes in the context of work that City divisions are undertaking, which 
aims to balance support for the growth of Toronto's nighttime economy with 
the need to ensure public safety, address nuisance issues and respond to 
problematic establishments.

Construction in downtown Yonge Street area
Council adopted a member motion calling for the creation of a working group 
with broad representation to address efforts to co-ordinate development 
and infrastructure work in the area bounded by Bay, Mutual, College/Carlton 
and Queen streets. The area is experiencing an unprecedented amount of growth, 
with 26 projects now active or about to begin, many of them requiring 
the replacement of aging infrastructure. The motion says these projects require 
co-ordination to ensure the safety of pedestrians and minimize impacts on vehicle 
traffic.

Development pressures in midtown Toronto
A member motion concerning the Yonge and Eglinton area, adopted by Council, 
requests a report on the impact of new development pressures and intensification 
on subway capacity at Eglinton Station, pedestrian safety, road capacity 
and traffic congestion. The motion notes that the higher density now allowed in 
the area is largely the result of new provincial planning legislation and policies, 
and the Ontario government's "rejection of most of the City's Midtown in Focus 
plan." 

Revitalizing the Dundas-Sherbourne area
Council adopted a series of recommendations for creating a comprehensive 
neighbourhood revitalization plan for the Dundas Street East and Sherbourne 
Street area of east downtown Toronto. This undertaking includes addressing 
issues that require collaboration among social-service sectors and across 
governments, such as affordable and supportive housing, crisis intervention, 
services for community members who have very low incomes or are homeless, 
and actions to address public safety concerns in the area. 

Live streaming of meetings at City Hall
A member motion supported by Council requests a report on the viability of 
making live streaming of board meetings held in Committee Rooms 1 and 2 
at City Hall routine. At present, Council and committee meetings are live 
streamed (broadcast in real time via the internet) but many other meetings 
are not streamed. The motion says all important meetings in Committee 
Rooms 1 and 2 could be live streamed with little extra cost, as the equipment 
and process are already in place. Doing so would "enhance openness, 
accountability and transparency in the City's governance process."

___________________________________________________________________

Council Highlights, a summary of selected decisions made by Toronto 
City Council, is produced by Strategic Communications. 

Formal documentation of City Council decisions: http://www.toronto.ca/council  
Questions about Council meetings and decisions: clerk@toronto.ca 
or 416-392-8016 
Information about distribution of this summary: stratcom@toronto.ca 
Previous editions: https://www.toronto.ca/home/media-room/
council-highlights/
More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
City of Toronto’s Services, Programs and Attractions During the Holiday Period
December 19, 2019

City of Toronto’s services, programs and attractions during the holiday period 

The City of Toronto's services, operations and municipal offices will be open most 
weekdays in late December but closed for the holidays December 25 and 26 
and on January 1 (New Year's Day). That also applies to the City's community 
centres, arenas, child-care centres and museums as well as the City Archives. 
The archives will also be closed Saturday, December 28. Services that regularly 
operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week such as 311 Toronto and frontline 
emergency services will be available every day. 

Toronto residents and visitors will be able to take advantage of many City 
programs and attractions offered during the holiday season, from outdoor winter 
recreational activities to indoor seasonal traditions. First up is tomorrow's annual 
Christmas concert at City Hall. 
 
City Hall's Christmas concert
The City's annual Christmas Concert will be held tomorrow (December 20) from 
noon to 1 p.m. in the rotunda of Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W. 
The public can join Mayor John Tory and councillors for one of the City's 
longest-running festive traditions. The concert, which has taken place every year 
since City Hall opened in 1965, will feature seasonal performances, a reading by 
Toronto Poet Laureate A.F. Moritz and an appearance by Santa Claus. Seating is 
limited. A secondary viewing area will be available in the Council Chamber via live 
video feed. More information is available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/christmasconcert.

Winter recreation – skiing, tobogganing, skating
The City welcomes winter, a time when Torontonians and visitors can lace up 
skates, toboggan at 28 local hills, ski (alpine and cross-country) or simply visit 
a warming station along King Street. Nathan Phillips Square is hosting free, 
drop-in skate programming with DJ skate nights and free instruction. 

Details about skating on outdoor rinks and indoor arenas, tobogganing 
and skiing/snowboarding (with the season starting January 1 for the City’s two 
ski/snowboard centres) are available 
at https://www.toronto.ca/welcome-to-winter/.

Indoor recreation
The City offers a variety of fitness classes and other drop-in recreation 
programming over the holidays. Community recreation centres will be open 
until 4 p.m. on December 24 and 31 (closed on December 25 and 26 
and January 1). Some facilities may be closed during the holiday period for 
annual maintenance. More information and schedules are available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/rec or by calling 311.

Drop-in swim programs are available at pools across Toronto this holiday season. 
City indoor pools will offer family-friendly leisure swims and fitness swims. 
Schedules vary by location and are available at http://www.toronto.ca/swim. 

Attractions
The City's Riverdale Farm and High Park Zoo are great family attractions for free 
holiday visits. Riverdale Farm is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The High Park 
Zoo is open daily from 7 a.m. to dusk. More information is available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/parks/zoo.

The City's two conservatories feature thousands of colourful blooms, vines 
and lush plants from around the world. The shows at Centennial Park 
Conservatory and Allan Gardens Conservatory run until January 9. 
More information: http://www.toronto.ca/conservatories/ 

Rink at Union Station 
A new skating rink on Front Street outside Union Station is open for free skating 
daily until January 4. Hours are Sunday to Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
and Thursday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. (weather permitting). 
Free skate and helmet rentals are an option, compliments of Union Station 
and TD, and free skating lessons are offered at noon and 4 p.m. daily. 
More details: https://torontounion.ca/tdunionholiday/  

Toronto Zoo
The Toronto Zoo is open daily 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. throughout the holiday 
season except December 25. The zoo's animals will participate in their own 
seasonal enrichment celebration from December 26 to January 5. The zoo is 
offering guests 50 per cent off regular zoo admission on Boxing Day. 
The Terra Lumina winter night walk series is underway too. The zoo's Facebook 
and Twitter handle is @TheTorontoZoo and the web address is 
http://www.torontozoo.com.

New Year's Eve at Nathan Phillips Square
Ringing in the new year at Nathan Phillips Square will start at 9 p.m. 
on December 31. This annual downtown celebration takes place against 
the backdrop of Toronto's official Christmas tree and lights. This year's musical 
performances will feature Zaki Ibrahim and Cris Derksen, and the evening will 
include a skating party sponsored by Tim Hortons,  with DJ Nana Zen. Fireworks 
at midnight will help attendees usher in 2020. 
More details: http://www.toronto.ca/newyearseve

Toronto history museums 
The City's History Museums are offering holiday-themed events and tours for 
families and adults. Most of the museums are open daily except Mondays. 
All the museums will be closed on December 25 and 26 as well as January 1. 
Times and participant age details for activities vary by date and location. 
More information is available at https://www.toronto.ca/holiday. (Click on 
"Tours & Experiences" for museum programming listed chronologically.) 

Below is a list of the museums and their locations: 
• Colborne Lodge (11 Colborne Lodge Dr. at the south end of High Park)
• Fort York National Historic Site (250 Fort York Blvd.) 
• Gibson House Museum (5172 Yonge St., North York)
• Mackenzie House (82 Bond St., downtown)
• Market Gallery (St. Lawrence Market, second floor at 95 Front St. E.)
• Montgomery’s Inn (4709 Dundas St. W., Etobicoke)
• Scarborough Museum (1007 Brimley Rd., Scarborough)
• Spadina Museum (285 Spadina Rd.)
• Todmorden Mills Heritage Site (67 Pottery Rd., east side of Don Valley Parkway)

St. Lawrence Market 
The St. Lawrence Market complex has modified hours over the winter holiday 
season, including extended Sunday and Monday hours for the South 
Market (8 a.m. to 4 p.m.) on December 22, 23, 24, 30 and 31. The South Market 
will be closed December 25 and 26 as well as January 1 and 2. Regular hours of 
operation will be in effect all other days this month and in January. 

The South Market, with its 64 merchants, is open five days a week year-round. 
During the holiday season, the St. Lawrence Market also offers various paid 
classes and free drop-in cooking demonstrations and seminars on holiday meal 
ideas. The St. Lawrence Market's Saturday farmers market and Sunday antique 
market operate year-round in the temporary market at 125 the Esplanade. 
Both markets will be open during the winter holiday season. The Saturday farmers 
market will be open from 5 a.m. to 3 p.m. on December 21 and 28. The Sunday 
antique market will be open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on December 22 and 29. 

More information about the St. Lawrence Market complex’s holiday hours 
and holiday-themed activities is available at http://www.stlawrencemarket.com.

Public transit
TTC service will be running on a modified service schedule on several days during 
the holiday season. Customers are encouraged to visit http://www.ttc.ca for more 
information. The TTC will also be providing free, extended New Year's Eve service
from 7 p.m. until 7 a.m. on January 1, courtesy of Corby Spirit and Wine. 
New Year's Eve subway times are available at http://www.ttc.ca.

GO Transit trains and buses and UP Express (Union Station/Pearson Airport train) 
will offer free service on New Year’s Eve after 7 p.m. Customers can board without 
tapping their Presto card or buying a ticket. As well, GO will ring in the New Year 
with additional late-night train service on the Lakeshore West, Lakeshore East, 
Barrie, Milton, Kitchener and Stouffville lines. Schedules: 
https://www.gotransit.com/en/travelling-with-us/promotions-and-events/new-
years-eve

Garbage and bins collection 
There will be no garbage, blue bin or green bin collection on December 25 
or January 1. Those who receive Wednesday daytime or night collection 
will receive collection on Thursday. Thursday daytime and night collection will be 
shifted to Friday. Friday daytime and night collection will be shifted to Saturday. 
Night collection will begin earlier than usual on December 24 and 31, so material 
should be placed out no later than 5 p.m. on those days. 

All transfer stations and depots for residential drop-off of garbage, yard waste, 
recyclables, household hazardous waste and electronics will be closed 
on December 25 and January 1. The City will not book any Toxic Taxi 
appointments from December 25 to 27, 31 or January 1. Regular service will 
resume on January 2. More information: 
https://www.toronto.ca/holiday-impacts/

Winter road operations 
The City's snow/ice-clearing services will continue as usual during the holidays 
as needed. Salt trucks will be sent out as soon as snow begins to accumulate. 
Road plows go to expressways, major roads and transit routes first (between 2.5 
to 5 cm of accumulation) and plowing on neighbourhood roads begins 
when the snow stops falling and if there is at least eight centimetres of 
accumulation on the road. 

Residents and business owners are reminded to clear the snow and ice from 
the sidewalk near their property, and to wait until crews have had a chance to 
clear the snow (up to 16 hours after the snow stops falling) before calling 311 
with related questions. During a snow storm, residents can find out more about 
Toronto’s snow plan and can track salt trucks/plows in real time 
at http://www.toronto.ca/snow.

Media contact: Media Relations, City of Toronto, 
416-338-5986, 
media@toronto.ca
More..Posted: Dec 19, 2019
City Council Aproves a New Parkland Strategy
November 26, 2019

City Council approves a new Parkland Strategy 

Today, City Council endorsed a new city-wide Parkland Strategy which will provide 
strategic direction on current and future parks planning, land acquisition, 
and investment. 

Toronto’s parks system is integral to its identity as a global, livable city, 
and it greatly contributes to its health, quality of life, social cohesion and ecological 
sustainability. Toronto has more than 1,500 parks, which cover approximately 
13 per cent of the city’s land base (totalling more than 8,000 hectares 
or 19,768 acres). 

The Strategy’s vision was developed through extensive engagement 
with stakeholders and the public and reflects how the City’s parks system should 
evolve over the next 20 years. 

It is led by guiding principles of expand, improve, include and connect. These 
principles reflect the need for a multi-faceted approach to how Toronto will 
continue to enhance its parks system in the face of different challenges 
and opportunities across the city. 

The Parkland Strategy findings have already informed City plans for Rail Deck Park 
and the parks and public realm plans for TOcore and Midtown in Focus.

Staff are recommending the Parkland Strategy be reviewed every five years to 
ensure that it remains relevant amidst increasing growth and change across 
Toronto. 

Quote  

“As the city grows and intensifies, the parks system will contend with 
the increased use of and need for additional park space for people to enjoy 
that is functional and accessible. The Parkland Strategy is an essential tool for 
navigating and balancing these needs.”
- Mayor John Tory

Media contact: 
Shane Gerard, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-5711, 
Shane.Gerard@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Dec 01, 2019
Mayor Tory to Launch City of Toronto’s Holiday Toy and Food Drive
November 26, 2019    
  
Mayor Tory to launch City of Toronto’s holiday toy and food drive

Mayor John Tory together with several City councillors will officially kick off this 
year's City of Toronto Holiday Toy and Food Drive at City Hall on Wednesday. 
They will be joined by Rick Berenz of the Toronto Fire Fighters Toy Drive 
and a representative of the Daily Bread Food Bank.

Date: Wednesday, November 27
Time: 12:30 p.m.
Location: Rotunda, Toronto City Hall, 100 Queen St. W. 

The City's annual Holiday Toy and Food Drive supports the Toronto Fire Fighters 
Toy Drive and Daily Bread Food Bank. Donations of new, unwrapped toys 
and/or non-perishable food items can be dropped off in collection bins at City Hall,
Metro Hall and all civic centres until noon on December 20. 

More information about the Toy and Food Drive is available 
at http://www.toronto.ca/holiday-toy-food-drive.

More information about the Toronto Fire Fighters Toy Drive is available 
at http://www.torontofirefighterstoydrive.org/Toy_Drive/Home.html.

More information about the Daily Bread Food Bank is available 
at http://www.dailybread.ca/.

Media contacts:
Lawvin Hadisi, Mayor's Office, 
416-338-3217, 
Lawvin.Hadisi@toronto.ca

Chris Fernandes, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-5211, 
Chris.Fernandes@toronto.ca 
More..Posted: Dec 01, 2019
Reduce, Reuse and Recycle Right This Holiday Season
November 28, 2019

Reduce, reuse and recycle right this holiday season

T'is the season for gift giving, holiday parties and spending time with family 
and friends. It’s also a time of year when people tend to produce more waste. 
As Black Friday and Cyber Monday approach, the City of Toronto is asking 
residents to be mindful of the waste they generate during the holiday season.  

Small changes to daily routines can make a big impact. Apply the 3Rs – reduce, 
reuse and recycle right – and try to incorporate some of the following tips into 
your holidays. Also check the 2020 waste management calendar, coming soon to 
your mailbox.

Reduce:
• Carry a reusable bag when shopping for holiday gifts and say no to excess 
tissue 
and packaging.
• Consider low-waste gifts such as gift cards, tickets to an event, an experiential 
or service-based gift or give a charitable donation in a loved one's name.
• Avoid single-use items such as cutlery, plates and cups when planning holiday 
parties.

Reuse:
• Save gift bags, gift wrap, ribbons and bows to reuse year after year.
• Host a holiday swap with parents to exchange kids’ clothes and toys that are no 
longer used.
• Get crafty when wrapping by using items you have around your house such as 
newspaper, old calendars and cards.

Recycle right:
• Dispose of foil/metallic wrapping paper, ribbons, bows, bubble wrap, bubble 
envelopes, packing peanuts and fruit crates in the garbage. 
• Recycle paper gift wrap and flattened cardboard, and rinse plastic plates 
and plastic cups before placing them in the Blue Bin (recycling).
• Never put recycling in black bags or throw black plastics in the Blue Bin 
(recycling).
• Use the Green Bin (organics) for fruit and vegetable scraps, meat including 
bones, spoiled cakes and cookies, and soiled paper plates and napkins (unless 
they have absorbed chemicals such as cleaning products).  

The City manages approximately 900,000 tonnes of waste each year. 
That requires money, energy and resources, and garbage takes up valuable landfill
space. As part of its Long-Term Waste Management Strategy, the City is 
encouraging Torontonians to reduce waste throughout the year.

For more tips and ideas on how to reduce, reuse and recycle right this holiday 
season, watch for your waste management calendar in the mail in December 
and visit http://www.toronto.ca/reduce-reuse. 

Information about how to properly dispose of holiday items is available 
at http://toronto.ca/wastewizard and on the new TOwaste App, available for 
download 
at https://www.toronto.ca/services-payments/recycling-organics-garbage/
towaste-app/.

Quote:

"Toronto is a vibrant, growing city but as we grow, so does the waste we produce. 
Our Waste Management Team does an excellent job of dealing with this 
and maximizing recycling but, this holiday season, I challenge all residents to try 
to reduce their waste."  
- Councillor James Pasternak (Ward 6 York Centre), Chair of the Infrastructure 
and Environment Committee

Media contact: Ashalea Stone, Strategic Communications,
 416-392-8306, 
Ashalea.Stone@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Dec 01, 2019
Celebrate the Holidays at Union Station with free Ice Skating on Front Street
November 28, 2019
  
Celebrate the Holidays at Union Station with free ice skating on Front Street

Torontonians will soon have a new place to spend some time skating over 
the holidays. Union Holiday-Presented by TD will take place on the Front Street 
plaza outside Union Station (Sir John A. Macdonald Plaza) from Friday, 
November 29 to Saturday, January 4. 

On Friday, a skating rink in front of the station will open for visitors, local 
esidents, office workers and families to skate for free on Front Street, with free 
skate and helmet rentals and free lessons compliments of Union Station and TD. 

The skating rink will be open daily (weather permitting) Sunday to Wednesday 
from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Thursday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

As part of the experience, visitors will be able to enjoy snacks and beverages from 
a rotating retail booth, check out the latest holiday gifts in the Best Buy Warming 
Lounge, and listen to local DJ talent from the TD Music Booth.

Inside Union Station, the historic West Wing will be decorated for the holiday 
season and feature free daily musical performances on the Steinway & Sons Spirio, 
the world’s finest high-resolution player piano, as well as a mix of live 
performances. 

Visitors can shop for gifts at one of Union Station’s many retailers in the Front 
Street Promenade on the lower level below the Great Hall and from 
December 9 to 24 have their gifts wrapped for free at the TD gift-wrapping 
station in the West Wing.

More details on the ice rink as well as the full event listings of performances inside 
Union Station are available at www.torontounion.ca/tdunionholiday. 

About Osmington
In 2009, Osmington (Union Station) Inc., a subsidiary of Osmington Inc., entered 
into an agreement with the City of Toronto to become the retail developer of 
Union Station pursuant to a 75-year head lease. With more than 300,000 daily 
visitors, Union Station is Canada's busiest transit hub. Through its curation of retail 
and culinary tenants, cultural programming and partnership activations, Union 
strives to be one of the world's most engaging civic experiences. 
Visit http://www.torontounion.ca or 
on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/torontounion, 
Instagram at http://www.instagram.com/torontounion 
or on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/torontounion #TDUnionHoliday

Quotes

"Union Station, the country's busiest transit hub, is already a destination for 
thousands of commuters and visitors to Toronto every day. And now for 
the holiday season, it becomes a destination for those looking for a bit of winter 
fun. Union Holiday will activate Front Street with the first ice rink ever created 
at the front door to our city." 
- Mayor John Tory

"Union continues to evolve and offer unique and creative ways to bring the best of 
Toronto to the gateway of the city. Whether it’s last minute gift purchases, a meal 
with your colleagues or a new family skating tradition, we are thrilled this holiday 
season to bring this one-of-a-kind event to Union Station.”
- Lawrence Zucker, President & CEO of Osmington

"TD is committed to connecting communities and building inclusive events that 
create some of the world’s most engaging civic experiences. We are delighted to 
be collaborating with Union again to offer this unique and festive experience.”
- Tyrrell Schmidt, Global Brand and Customer Experience Officer, TD Bank Group


Media contact: Bruce Hawkins, Strategic Communications, 
416-392-9418, 
Bruce.Hawkins@toronto.ca
More..Posted: Dec 01, 2019
City of Toronto Purchases Lands at 29 Judson St. from ML Ready Mix
November 29, 2019

After an extensive due diligence process, the City of Toronto has completed 
the Agreement of Purchase and Sale at 29 Judson St. and now owns the property 
currently occupied by ML Ready Mix. 

The purchase is the next step in the process of relocating ML Ready Mix from its 
current site in a residential area in south Etobicoke to its future location 
at 545 Commissioners St. in the Port Lands. Under the terms of the agreement, 
ML Ready Mix has up to one year to move their operations from 29 Judson St. to 
Commissioners Street. 

To get to this point, the City established a working group of various City divisions 
including Economic Development & Culture, City Planning and Toronto Building, 
along with CreateTO, Toronto Public Health, Metrolinx, the Ontario Ministry of 
the Environment, Conservation and Parks, and local residents. 

The relocation of ML Ready Mix from 29 Judson St. to 545 Commissioners 
St. presents a strategic opportunity to further consolidate concrete batching 
operations in the Port Lands, while at the same time reducing land use conflicts 
currently experienced by the residents of the Judson Street community in south
Etobicoke.

The City has entered into a one-year leaseback with ML Ready Mix at 29 Judson 
St. to enable a smooth transition and relocation of operations to the Port Lands 
site. 

Quotes

"This is an important step forward for south Etobicoke. We've listened to residents' 
concerns and worked together to address those concerns. I want to thank 
Councillor Mark Grimes and South Etobicoke residents for their patience 
and determination in seeing this through and for the hard work they put into 
this resolution that's good for the community and our city."
- Mayor John Tory

"In 2012, I moved a motion at City Council prohibiting concrete batching 
and other heavy industrial uses in a large section of south Etobicoke. I am grateful 
to City staff and the members of the working group who all worked tirelessly to 
make this relocation happen. I also want to thank ML Ready Mix for their 
cooperation in recognizing their operation was not compatible with the local 
community, and for coming to the table to get this done."
- Councillor Mark Grimes (Ward 3 Etobicoke-Lakeshore)

Media contact: Bruce Hawkins, Strategic Communications, 
Bruce.Hawkins@toronto.ca, 
416-392-9418

More..Posted: Dec 01, 2019
City Council Today Endorsed the Most Aambitious Parks and Recreation Facility Development Program Implementation Strategy in Toronto's Hstory
October 29, 2019

Ambitious strategy for Toronto parks and recreation facilities endorsed by 
City Council

City Council today endorsed the most ambitious parks and recreation facility 
development program implementation strategy in Toronto's history, representing 
a $2.223 billion investment in recreation facilities across the city over 
the next 20 years.

The Parks and Recreation Facilities Master Plan 2019-2038 (FMP) reinforces 
the City's commitment to providing high quality parks and recreation facilities for 
all residents. The plan is informed by Toronto’s growing and changing population, 
and by the ongoing high demand for parks and recreation programs and services. 
Toronto City Council approved the FMP in 2017 and directed staff to report back 
on a detailed implementation strategy.

The strategy provides an evidence-based investment roadmap for when, 
how and where to enhance and revitalize the City's current assets and where to 
build new and improved facilities. The strategy is a living document that can 
respond to opportunities and reflect changing local conditions such 
as unanticipated growth or land becoming available.

Increasing demand for parks and recreation services across the city is fueled by 
Toronto’s unprecedented and concentrated population growth. The FMP 
implementation strategy gives the City the tools to prioritize and build the right 
facilities, in the right places at the right time. If current funding levels are 
maintained, it's estimated that there is sufficient funding based on the 2019-2028 
Capital Budget and Plan for new and enhanced facilities.

Public engagement played an essential role in developing this plan 
and implementation strategy. Almost 6,000 individuals, groups and organizations 
participated in the process. 

This plan responds to the high demand and changing demographics by 
recommending 45 new soccer/multi-use fields, 30 basketball courts 
and five cricket pitches. It also recommends adding new, state-of-the-art 
multi-pad arenas to replace existing older, single-pad arena facilities. 
This plan is committed to increasing the City's ice pad supply by making 
the most of existing facilities and ensuring there is no net loss to Toronto's ice 
pads. The plan invests in existing infrastructure by revitalizing community 
recreation centres and upgrading sport fields, rinks, pools and courts. 

This strategy addresses long-standing service gaps by improving equity in 
recreation service in underserved communities, with nearly 90 per cent of 
recommended revitalizations and 75 per cent of planned new centres serving 
Neighbourhood Improvement Areas.
Staff will report back to Council on implementation progress every five years.
 More information about the master plan is available 
at http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgendaItemHistory.do?item=2019.EX9.5
Quote:

"This is the most ambitious recreation facility development program in the City's 
history, representing a $2.223 billion investment in parks and recreation facilities 
to serve our growing and changing population over the next 20 years. 
We're taking action to ensure Toronto's current and future residents have access 
to recreation services they need and want."
- Mayor John Tory 

Media contact: Shane Gerard, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-5711, 
Shane.Gerard@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019
A Request for Proposals (RFP)
October 31, 2019
  
Tenants First plan moves forward with release of RFP to start transfer of Toronto 
Community Housing Corporation's scattered houses 

A Request for Proposals (RFP) will be issued today to initiate the transfer of 
Toronto Community Housing Corporation's (TCHC) scattered portfolio of houses 
(single unit or multiple apartments within a house, scattered across the city) to 
non-profit housing providers, co-ops and community land trusts that are qualified 
to engage with tenants, improve the condition of the properties and retain 
the properties as affordable housing in perpetuity. The RFP covers 
623 TCHC-owned houses, representing 730 units. Tenants living in the scattered 
housing portfolio will not lose their housing or their subsidy.

Toronto City Council in 2017 approved the Tenants First: Phase 1 Implementation 
Plan to restructure the operation, governance and funding of TCHC. Since then, 
the City and TCHC have been building a new relationship with the aim of 
improving services for tenants and protecting the value of the $10-billion social 
housing asset. 

On January 31, 2018, City Council adopted Implementing Tenants First – TCHC 
Scattered Portfolio Plan and an interim selection process for tenant directors on 
the TCHC Board, which continues the Council-approved plan and includes 
the transfer of an identified group of TCHC properties. In addition to this RFP for 
the scattered portfolio, a process is already underway to transfer ownership 
and operation of TCHC's agency houses and rooming houses to qualified 
non-profit housing operators. 

The capital backlog associated with the scattered portfolio properties, 
as of the end of 2016, was $33.9 million. TCHC spends approximately $6 million 
annually in building repair capital on this portfolio. By removing these scattered 
houses from TCHC's portfolio, there will be a reduction in the overall capital repair 
backlog and future capital requirements, as those costs will be transferred with 
the properties to the new housing providers. 

As part of the terms of the transfer, the City will continue to fund the new housing 
providers to deliver social housing. The funding cost and financial impact to 
the City will be dependent on the operating agreements negotiated as part of 
the RFP process which will be considered by Toronto City Council in 2020 
as part of a comprehensive transfer plan. 

The RFP will be issued to non-profit housing organizations, including housing 
co-operatives and community land trusts. Proponents will need to present a viable 
business case and demonstrate a willingness to work within a changing social 
housing sector, build capacity over time and work closely with other organizations. 
Accountability tools are outlined in the RFP and City staff will conduct a detailed 
financial and risk assessment of the transfer of this portfolio, including assessment 
of individual properties. The proponents' plans must ensure that adequate capital 
and operating funds are available from federal, provincial, City or private sources 
to provide for a state of good repair and ongoing, long-term financial viability. 
The City will continue to have a strong oversight role in the operations of 
the social housing assets through operating agreements with the housing 
providers.

A joint review panel made up of TCHC and City staff will make 
the recommendations about successful transferee agencies. Council will consider 
the recommendations in 2020 as part of the comprehensive proposed transfer 
plan, before approving the award of the RFP. If approved, it is expected that 
the houses will be transferred starting in 2020 through to 2022.

The RFP closes at noon on January 29, 2020. More information about the RFP 
and process can be found at https://www.toronto.ca/community-people/
community-partners/affordable-housing-partners/open-requests-for-proposals/. 

Quotes:

"The RFP is the next step in the process of modernizing our housing portfolio to 
achieve better quality of life for tenants and establish a more sustainable funding 
model. The transfer of a public asset of this magnitude to the non-profit sector is 
significant, however this process is grounded in best practices, thorough planning 
and a strong accountability framework."
- Mayor John Tory 

"The beginning of the transfer process is an important milestone. The transfer of 
the scattered housing portfolio will free up resources for TCHC to focus on its core 
portfolio, while improving the condition of these properties and retaining them 
as affordable housing."
- Deputy Mayor Ana Bailão (Ward 9 Davenport), Chair of the Planning 
and Housing Committee 

Media contact: Ellen Leesti, Strategic Communications, 
416-397-1403, 
Ellen.Leesti@toronto.ca

More..Posted: Nov 01, 2019